Month: January 2015

Featured Artist: Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes is a professional weaver residing in Delaware County, New York. She studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), and the Center for Tapestry Arts in New York City. Tabitha designs both functional and aesthetic products using traditional American patterns. Her work can be seen in museums and gallery exhibits, and at various arts and crafts fairs throughout the region. She has exhibited and sold her handwoven products at the following venues: Catskill Mountain Artisans Guild (Margaretville and Pakatakan Farmers Market), Erpf House-Catskill Center for Conservation and Development (Arkville), Middleburgh Artisans Cooperative, Roxbury Arts Group, Shaker Heritage Museum (Albany), Lefferts Farmhouse Historical Museum (Brooklyn), and Brooklyn Museum.

I visited Tabitha’s studio in Roxbury on January 11, 2015.

Simona David: Tabitha, please talk a little bit about the history of weaving.

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes: Weaving is one of the oldest forms of a blend of art and function. The techniques of twisting fibers to make them stronger and durable started out probably in the earliest times of mankind history. From those twisted fibers men and women wove reed baskets and textiles. For instance, in a lot of the Native American pottery from the South-Western U.S. and Central and South America you will see that twisted fibers have been pressed up against the clay to create a pattern on that clay. It’s been made as an impression on the clay to make it look as it was woven. In reality, it is a three-dimensional structure that was never plated or twisted in itself. During the Middle Ages guilds were set up in Europe that focused on the development and guidelines for designing and weaving tapestries as well as cloth for clothing and bedding. The recent tapestry exhibit of Pieter Coeke van Aelst at the Metropolitan Museum in New York City clarifies the time consuming detail process of weaving large tapestries, many of which depict stories of heroes from mythology and the Bible, and that only kings were wealthy enough to commission such works.

On the Eastern coast of the U.S. it’s the Scottish, German and French immigrants who brought with them the knowledge, equipment, and weave patterns that were used to create fabric for everyday clothes and fancy bedlinens. For instance, a lot of the patterns classified and most readily preserved and recognized as  Colonial American patterns were brought up by the Germans settling around Pennsylvania, while the Delhi Jacquard Coverlets featured at the Patterns that you may see at the Delaware County Historical Association in Delhi were designed and woven by the Scottish immigrants who settled in Delaware County or in Canada during the 1700s and early 1800s.

With the Industrial Revolution, which included the development of water or steam powered looms in mills in England, Scotland, and Massachusetts, the time consuming and manual process of weaving one’s fabric for bedding and clothing died, and books of handwritten weave patterns gathered dust and were forgitten except in very rural parts of the Eastern US states, like Rhode Island, North Carolina, Tennessee.  development of . Then in the 1930s and 1940s weaving was re-introduced to the farmers’ wives in South and North Carolina. It followed a period of renewed interest in weaving. A lot of the weaving in our area in the Catskills was done for family consumption, and was done predominantly by the women, perhaps both as a way to recapture before total loss our textile heritage and to provide income to families struggling economically during the Depression Era.

SD: When was your first encounter with weaving, and what triggered this lifelong interest?

TGB: I had a high school classmate who had left high school to go to another school – I believe in New Hampshire. And when she came back to visit, she talked about weaving. That really caught my imagination. Why? I don’t know. I come from a family that is in many ways artistically talented – painters, stained glass makers, writers, architects. I needed to craft out an artistic niche for myself, and that was weaving. Having a good color sense the textile arts have appealed to me.

Artist Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. (c) artinthecatskills.com

SD: And then you studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.

TGB: I attended the Fashion Institute of Technology from 1974 to 1976. I was an evening student. This was part of their Textile and Service Design Department. We were working on very small looms – 7 inch wide metal frame looms. These were difficult to work with. But weaving wasn’t a forgotten art. I liked the mathematical structure of setting up the loom. I fell in love with what it takes to create fabric. And when I mix the colors, when I mix the texture of the yarns together – to me that’s magical – how I get a piece of fabric: something out of nothing.

SD: You’re also a spinner, and sometimes you buy wool, cotton, or other materials, and spin. Do you remember the first piece you ever made?

TGB: A lot of the weaving we did at the Fashion Institute of Technology involved creating small samples in various patterns. The earliest samples I made I have probably either given them away or sold them. In the 1980s I went into business creating place mates, table runners, pillows, scarves, and I was selling them.

SD: Would you like to talk about your evolution as a weaver, and discuss various guilds you belong to?

TGB: I’ve always been involved in various groups, and here in the Catskills I’m involved with the Catskill Mountains Artisan Guild. I joined the Catskill Mountains Guild in 2007. I believe I’m the only weaver in the Margaretville store. In the past I had also taken classes at the Center for Tapestry Arts in New York City – I believe that’s no longer in existence. One of the workshop leaders was Michelle Lester. She was a professional weaver – at FIT my best teacher was Nell Znamierowski, another professional in the textile industry. She was in the industry, and created samples for Pan Am Airways, for example. I was learning from professionals in the field, but a lot of the work that I do is also self-taught.

SD: Let’s take a look at the loom you have here in the studio.

TGB: The loom here in the studio is an AVL loom. It is a professional loom. It’s a 16 harness floor loom, and it’s a DOBBY loom. DOBBY refers to a particular way the threads are manipulated. The number of harnesses represents the trays on which there are heddles, and heddles are what supports the threads through a peg board system that activates the raising and lowering of harnesses. The harnesses and the DOBBY system manipulate what’s called the warp. It’s a vertical thread that goes from from the back beam on the loom through the heddles on the harnesses, then through the reed to be tied onto the front beam, which is where I sit to weave. The weft is on a shuttle, it goes to right angles to the warp, and that’s what I do as part of the weaving process. It’s a little complicated, and that’s why I enjoy when people come to my studio to get to see it. I’ve had this loom since 1990, and that’s how I do all my weaving.

SD: How about your yarns?

TGB: Cotton, wool, silk, linen. I do occasionally have non-natural fibers like acrylics. I prefer keeping it natural, because it gives me a business edge. The Jacquard Acid Dyes that I use with the wool that I do buy here in the County are environmentally friendly. I use a lot of water for a pound of wool to be dyed, less than a half of teaspoon of the dye powder, and about a ½ cup of vinegar – the vinegar being the acid. I come up with really bright colors. This past summer I got to work with plants like black walnut shells, golden rod, black-eyed-susan, indigo leaves – these are some of the colors used on wool: bright yellow, brownish-red, and also some blended colors.

SD: Where do you buy your supplies from?

TGB: All of the cotton that I have here in the studio I got through Webs – it’s a place in Northampton, Massachusetts – a factory size operation. They have tons of yarns available: wool, mohair, cottons. They have weaving supplies, they have crocheting and knitting supplies, they have books. It’s a wealth of supplies. The website is http://www.yarn.com. Also, much of the wool that I have here in the studio comes from an initial batch that I got years ago from someone who was selling out her yarns in Brooklyn. I also buy wool here in Delaware County from sheep and alpaca breeders. The Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck is also a great source – it takes place the third weekend in October. I only go there every four or five years when I have a full shopping list.

SD: You’ve been featured in many magazines: Pure Catskills, Catskill Country, Greene Door magazine. Last summer you participated in the Open Studio Tour that has taken place last Sunday in July since 2012 in Andes, Margaretville and Roxbury area. Last year you were also the recipient of a NYSCA – DEC grant to work with students at the Roxbury Central School. Let’s talk about some of the coverage in the media, and also let’s talk about things that haven’t been covered.

TGB: Pure Catskills Guide is published annually by the Watershed Agricultural Council in Walton. I’ve been a member since 2007. My products are listed under Value Added Farm Products. The next issue comes up in July. Lillian Browne wrote an article about fiber-related professions for the Catskill Country magazine fall / winter 2014 issue – that is published by Decker Publishing in Delhi. I was also featured in Greene Door magazine. In 2014 I received a grant from NYSCA – DEC program. I worked with Madalyn Warren from the Straight Out of the Ground farm, who also operates the Roxbury Central School’s garden. We worked with third grade students this past September, and we taught them how to work with botanicals to dye wool. The aim was to enhance their understanding of what Colonial American life was like. The farm families during the Colonial period were very self-sufficient.

SD: Now let’s talk specifically about your work as a weaver. Let’s get closer to your loom. You’ve been working on this loom for the past twenty-five years. Please, demonstrate the weaving process.

TGB: What I have now on the loom is a piece I’m working on – it’s a summer shawl. It’s a green mohair fiber – moss color is my dominant color. My accent colors are done in stripes: bright, clear yellow, and buttercup yellow.  On the weft I have a dark green, a dark blue, and a very dark purple, mixed with a very thin gold thread. In the weft process I separate my warp into two layers. At right angles to the warp my weft is laid in between those two layers. It creates a net. In this particular case I want my rows of weft to be really close together so it’s a dense piece of fabric. The yellow thread gives you some sparkle; the dark blue and green colors help to highlight the moss green and yellow.

Artist Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. (c) artinthecatskills.com

SD: What is your primary drive in the process of weaving?

TGB: The mix of colors and the textures of the yarns that I’m using.

SD: Weavers have always woven both for functional and aesthetic purposes, going back to ancient times. You’re doing the same thing today. You are making fancy tapestry for purely aesthetic reasons, and you’re also making functional objects like scarves, blankets, and pillow covers. Let’s talk about the variety of products that you make.

TGB: I came to weaving primarily to do functional things: place mates, table runners, covers for pillows. In the early 1990s I’ve also started to explore creative projects, and begun doing tapestry. I work on what I feel like, and what my inventory at the Catskill Mountains Artisan Guild needs.

SD: To a certain extent you are a multi-media artist. You also do wood-block prints. You have a composition here done both as tapestry and wood-block print. I would assume it takes two completely different sets of skills.

TGB: It does. This project started with a series of photographs taken at a stream nearby. I took a print making class at SUNY New Paltz. I carved, and mixed the colors, and achieved a three-dimensional quality by overlapping layers of colors. Wood-block printing is a very technical process. I was very pleased with how the colors came out, how the subtlety of the snow came out blueish rather than looking purple or grey. And then I translated that wood-block print into a tapestry. Again, overlapping the colors, and achieving the shadow effect which had to look realistic. That was a real challenge. It’s easy to make changes on wood-block by coloring it with crayons or ink, but it’s not so easy to make changes on tapestry. On tapestry, once you start weaving, if you need to make changes, you have to take everything out and start all over.

Composition by Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. (c) artinthecatskills.com
Composition by Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes: done in wood-block print (up), and tapestry (down).

SD: Do you have any upcoming events you’d like to talk about?

TGB: I’m in the process of setting up a shop on Etsy at http://www.etsy.com/shop/TGBWEAVINGSTUDIO; I was encouraged to join Etsy by another textile artist with exceptional skills. It will be probably up by February. Soon I will be presenting again my Introduction to Weaving workshop at the Delaware County Historical Association in Delhi. I also have a weaving student who is creating a scarf. I am mentoring her. And we hope to have again the Andes-Margaretville-Roxbury Open Studio Tour this summer.

SD: Are people today still interested in weaving, and if so, what exactly attracts them to this craft?

TGB: I have the sense I may be one of the very few weavers here in Delaware County. There are some weavers in Narrowsburg and Port Jervis. There are some docents who teach students who visit the Ashokan Field Campus in Ulster County. Also, the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown has a weaver and docents who demonstrate and discuss the textile arts of the Colonial American period. I think what keeps one from being a weaver is the size of the equipment. It’s also time-consuming: it could take up to eight hours to set up everything for a new project.

SD: How does your schedule look like?

TGB: I usually work on weekends. And that includes anything from planning a new project, bookkeeping, and marketing. I also have a scrapbook and a weaving notebook that I update, and write down new ideas. When I retire from my day job, I do plan this to become a full-time operation.

SD: What do you like most about being a weaver, and what do you find most challenging?

TGB: It’s a very satisfying craft, because I am making something. It is challenging, but the rewards are strong.

SD: You are very active, and rather pragmatic for an artist. You also take care of the business side, you do social media, so forth and so on. How can people get in touch with you, and find more about what you do?

TGB: I am on Facebook at facebook.com/tgbweavingstudio, and I blog at tabithagilmore-barnesstudio.blogspot.com. I’m also on Pinterest at pinterest.com/tgbweaving. I update my blog weekly, and I showcase what inspires me. To make appointments and visit the studio, call (607) 326-7662.

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. (c) artinthecatskills.com

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes is a weaver, spinner and educator living and working in Delaware County.

© 2015 Simona David

 

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Weekend in the Catskills – 1/30/15

Bard Spring Season

The Spring Season at Fischer Center at Bard College in Dutchess County begins this Saturday, January 31 at 8 p.m. with an Opera workshop called “Danger and Devotion,” staging operatic scenes from the 1600s to the 1900s. Students from the Bard College Opera Workshop will perform in the chorus and as soloists. Founded in 1860 in Annandale-on-Hudson, in Dutchess County, New York, Bard College has been a haven for writers, artists, intellectuals, and scientists since the mid-1930s, when many luminaries fled Europe and settled in New York. The college is an important cultural institution in the region, and includes the Hessel Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts. In addition, every summer Bard offers an eight week long arts festival – Bard SummerScape, which takes place in July and August, and a classical music festival – Bard Music Festival, which takes place in August. For full program, visit http://fishercenter.bard.edu/springevents/.

The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College

Also, in Dutchess County the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College is opening a new exhibit this Friday, January 30 – XL: Large-Scale Paintings from the Permanent Collection, on view through March 29. Founded in 1864, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center houses over 18,000 paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculptures, textiles, ceramics and glass wares from ancient times to the present. The collections include many European and American masters, such as Albrecht Durer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Pablo Picasso, and others. The Warburg Collection contains works by leading artists of the Hudson River School of Painting such as Frederic Edwin Church. Two new installations are also worth checking out: http://info.vassar.edu/news/announcements/2014-2015/150123-fllac-installations.html. For more information about Vassar’s Art Center, visit http://fllac.vassar.edu.

Carrie Haddad Gallery

Carrie Haddad Gallery, located in Hudson, Columbia County, opened in 1991 as the city’s first gallery. It showcases many established as well as emerging artists. Painted Cities, a multi-media group show, opened this Wednesday, January 28 and will run through March 1. The gallery is open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 12 noon to 5 p.m. For more information, visit http://carriehaddadgallery.com/

Huguenot Street

Historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, Ulster County, includes seven authentic historic stone houses built by Huguenot settlers fleeing Europe in the late 1600s – early 1700s. The seven existing homes were built between 1705 and 1799 in the Dutch rural architectural style – some of these households also include Federal elements. In addition to these homes, the Historic Huguenot Street includes a church, a research library, and an archive. The street, in its current state, was founded in 1894 by the descendents of the first settlers; it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. Special events are organized year round. For more information, visit http://www.huguenotstreet.org.

Arts Society of Kingston 

Arts Society of Kingston (ASK) in Ulster County was founded in 1995, and presents ten – twelve juried art shows each year. Workshops and other events are organized year round, including poetry readings, musicals, plays, and other performances. On view through January 31 there is a member exhibition called Interaction of Color, and a spotlight exhibit featuring paintings by Isaac Abrams inspired by Physics, Chemistry and Biology. The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 1 to 6 p.m., and by appointment. For more information, visit http://www.askforarts.org.

Enjoy an artful Catskills weekend!

 

© Simona David

Weekend in the Catskills – 1/23/15

January may seem like forever up here in the mountains with cold, long nights, and not enough sun to keep us company. But there is art, and that is nourishing.

Many events taking place this weekend: exquisite collections of art at the Hyde Museum in Glens Falls, quirky and fresh Creative Non-Fiction presented by Writers in the Mountains in Pine Hill, the 18th celebration of the Columbia County’s juried art show in Hudson, a family fun event in Monticello, and superlative theater performances in Albany.

The Hyde Collection Art Museum and Historic Home

The Hyde Collection includes a wide array of art objects and antiques – paintings, sculptures, pottery, books and furniture – spanning thousands of years of civilization. It was established by Charlotte Pruyn Hyde and her husband Louis Fiske Hyde in their 1912 American Renaissance mansion in Glens Falls, Warren County. The collection includes works by Italian Renaissance masters Domenico Tintoretto, Raphael, and Sandro Botticelli; Spanish Renaissance painter, sculptor and architect El Greco; Baroque painters Peter Paul Rubens and Rembrandt van Rijn; French Neo-Classical painter Ingres; French Impressionists Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir; Post-Impressionist painters like Paul Cézanne and Vincent Van Gogh, as well as modern painters such as Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. American masters including Winslow Homer are also represented in this collection. In addition to its permanent holdings, the museum hosts temporary exhibitions and other educational programs.

The Stone Palette: Lithographs in 19thCentury France exhibit just opened earlier in January, and will run through March 2015. Black and white, and color prints in a variety of techniques are included in this show. Also Wild Nature: Masterworks from the Adirondack Museum opened on January 18, showcasing sixty-two paintings, photographs and prints depicting American wilderness. Included in this exhibit are works by Thomas Cole, Sanford Gifford, Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, and other American masters. Wild Nature will be on view through April 2015.

The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 12 noon to 5 p.m. For more information and current hours of operation, visit http://www.hydecollection.org/.

Writers in the Mountains

Writers in the Mountains (WIM), a premier literary organization in the Catskills, invites the public to a Creative Non-Fiction reading this Sunday, January 25 at 1 p.m. The reading, which will take place at the Pine Hill Community Center in Ulster County, will feature some of WIM’s best writers: Bonnie Lykes, Cheryl Holtzman, Evelyn Ellsworth,  Ellen Stewart, Faye Storms, Gail Lennstrom, Judy Bloom, Geoff Rogers, Lillian Browne, Sharon Israel, and Theodora Anema. Great stories, light refreshments and good humor are a given. For more information about this event, visit http://writersinthemountains.org/.

Hudson Opera House

Hudson Opera House in Hudson, Columbia County, is hosting Columbia County Council on the Arts (CCCA)’s 18th Annual Juried Art Show curated this year by photographer Jack Shear. Over thirty artists working in all media are represented in this show which runs through February 15. Founded in 1965, CCCA organizes exhibitions and other events for artists in Columbia County. The organization operates its own gallery on Warren Street in Hudson. CCCA gallery is open Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, visit http://www.artscolumbia.org/

Sullivan County Annual Family Fun Day

Sullivan County Chamber of Commerce presents its 9th annual Family Fun Day this Saturday, January 24 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event, which takes place at the Holiday Mountain in Monticello, includes activities such as skiing and snow tubing at discounted rates. A cardboard sled race begins at 1 p.m. The event will conclude with a free concert performed by Chelsea Cavanaugh. For more information, visit https://sullivancountynycoc.wliinc20.com/events/eventdetail.aspx?eventid=874.

Capital Repertory Theatre 

Capital Repertory Theatre, founded in 1981 in Albany, offers a variety of performances every year. Through February 8 the theater presents How Water Behaves, a comedy by Sherry Kramer, directed by Gordon Greenberg. Historical plays such as On-the-Go! They Built America! and Souvenir are presented throughout the month of March this year. Also, Shakespeare’s masterpiece Hamlet will be performed from April 21 to May 10. For more information, visit http://capitalrep.org.

Have a great weekend!

The Second Edition Is Now Available as Paperback and E-Book

 

BookCoverPreview - Copy

Art in the Catskills, The Definitive Guide to the Catskills’ Rich Cultural Life is a compendium of one hundred and twenty-three arts organizations, events and other attractions in the Catskills and surrounding area, some in the neighboring Hudson Valley, and others elsewhere upstate New York. The guide includes anything from museums and memorial sites to summer festivals, art galleries and residencies, as well as theater and literary retreats. It walks the reader through a wide geographic area, from Woodstock to Livingston Manor, and Saratoga Springs to Cooperstown. Easy to digest, Art in the Catskills is a great resource for art enthusiasts travelling through the region.

Weekend in the Catskills – 1/16/15

This weekend in the Catskills – many art show openings, and performances. As usual, lots of things to do. Here are my recommendations.

Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild  

This Saturday, January 17 at 4 pm the Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild is hosting an opening reception re:Member, an annual group show featuring works in various media by current members. The reception will take place at the Kleinert / James Center on Tinker Street. A Best in Show prize will be awarded. Following the reception there will be an open mic for artists to share their thoughts, as well as live music, poetry, and storytelling performances. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.woodstockguild.org/ai1ec_event/annual-members-show-re-member-opening-reception/.

Longyear Gallery 

Longyear Gallery. (c) Simona David
Longyear Gallery. (c) Simona David

Longyear Gallery in Margaretville, Delaware County, is hosting an opening reception this Saturday, January 17 at 3 pm. This is a group show featuring artists affiliated with the gallery. Longyear is an artist-run cooperative founded in 2007, and featuring artists in all media and styles. Participating artists include Margaret Leveson, Ellen Wong, Helene Manzo, Ann Lee Fuller, Nat Thomas, and others. For more information, visit http://www.longyeargallery.org.

Catskill Art Society  

Catskill Art Society in Livingston Manor, Sullivan County, is also hosting an opening reception this Saturday, January 17 at 3 pm; an Artist Talk will take place at 2 pm. Flux features three different artists whose works are linked by a common theme: nothing is constant but change. Claire Breidenbach, Christopher Manning, and Cathellen Parra will exhibit photography and installations that speak about evolution and change. The show will run through February 7. For more information, visit http://catskillartsociety.org/exhibits.

The Arts Upstairs

The Arts Upstairs Gallery in Phoenicia, Ulster County is hosting a Potluck Party this Saturday, January 17 at 6 pm featuring a group show by its members, and also extending the solo exhibit of artist Anthony Margiotta. Margiotta recently received Honorable Mention and The People’s Choice award for his painting Prospect Park. Margiotta is also a member of the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum (WAAM). For more information about Arts Upstairs, visit http://www.artsupstairs.com/.

The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck

The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck in Dutchess County presents Sunday in the Park with George, a musical by Stephen Sondheim exploring the life and work of French Post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat. The musical addresses questions such as what is art, and what is life? Performances are held Friday and Saturday at 8 pm, and Sunday at 3 pm. For more information, visit http://www.centerforperformingarts.org/all-shows-sp-1131460608/item/sunday-in-the-park-with-george.

Enjoy an artful weekend in the Catskills, and check out the area’s ski resorts!

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Hunter Mountain. (c) Simona David

 

Weekend in the Catskills – 1/9/15

It’s a frigid weekend in the Catskills with temperatures in the low teens. But perfect though for wandering through art galleries, attending storytelling events, or taking workshops. Art is uplifting.

Dia:Beacon

Dia:Beacon Gallery in Beacon, Dutchess County, is hosting a Community Day event this Saturday, January 10 from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm with a program dedicated to families with children. Titled “Imaginary Alphabets and Intentional Accidents,” the program includes playful exercises with works by Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Sol LeWitt, and Richard Serra meant to engage children in fun and instructive activities. For more information, visit http://www.diaart.org.

Glaring Omissions Writers Group

Glaring Omissions Writers Group in Woodstock, Ulster County, presents “Prose on Youth,” a reading event featuring writers Nanci Panuccio, Robert Burke Warren, Betty MacDonald, and Violet Snow. The event, hosted by the Golden Notebook Bookstore, takes place Sunday, January 11 at 4 pm. The four writers will be reading from their works which address a variety of themes: parent – child relationship, music, theater, and the relationship one has with his or her ancestors. For more information about this event, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/1508773069411593/?ref=3&ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular.

Utopia Soundstage

Utopia Soundstage in Bearsville will be hosting “Every Summer Has a Story,” an event organized by Martha Frankel, the executive director of the Woodstock Writers Festival. This is a story slam competition; the winner will receive books, chocolate, and a spot at the Woodstock Writers Festival Story Slam event on March 19. For more information, visit http://storyslams.com/the-storytellers/.

Fenimore Art Museum

Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, Otsego County, is hosting the Cabin Fever Film Series, an event co-sponsored by the National Baseball Museum and the Glimmerglass Opera Festival. This Friday, January 9 at 6:30 pm there will be a screening of the West Side Story in the museum’s auditorium. This is the 11th edition of the Cabin Fever Film Series. For more information, visit http://baseballhall.org/node/3582.

Hudson Valley Pottery School and Studio

Hudson Valley Pottery School and Studio located in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, offers a variety of workshops both for beginner and advanced potters. Adult classes are held on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Classes for families with children are offered on Saturday. Classes specifically tailored to teens are offered on Friday. Private lessons can be arranged. In addition to workshops, the school also hosts open studios and sales events. For more information about these programs, visit http://www.hudsonvalleypottery.com/

 

 

Weekend in the Catskills – 1/2/15

Happy New Year!

This weekend:

Fenimore Art Museum 

Fenimore Art Museum is hosting Paint the Town – Community Mural Painting Event this
Saturday, January 3 from 10 am to 4 pm. The mural will depict Cooperstown’s winter scenery, and capture the area’s idyllic gaze. Once completed, the mural will hang on the walls of the museum’s auditorium. The event is open to all ages. For more information, visit http://www.fenimoreartmuseum.org/programs/%5Bfield_program_type-raw%5D/paint_the_town.

Olana

Friday, January 2 Olana estate in Hudson will be hosting Build a Terrarium workshop from 10 am to 12 noon. A terrarium is a miniature ecosystem of plants developed in 1842 by a botanist, and often used as a decorative object. Children are welcome. For more information, visit http://www.olana.org/calendar/build-terrarium/?doing_wp_cron=1419275525.8236470222473144531250.

Albany Institute of History and Art

The Albany Institute of History and Art is hosting an exhibit dedicated to Thomas Cole (1801 – 1848), the founder of the Hudson River School of Painting, on view through January 25. The Institute owns a significant collection of Cole’s works. Included in this exhibit are some of Cole’s Italian paintings, allegorical works, landscapes, and sketches. For more information, visit http://www.albanyinstitute.org/thomas-cole.html.

Windham Chamber Music Festival

Windham Chamber Music Festival will present a jazz concert this Saturday, January 3 at 8 pm. Lynne Arriale, piano, and Larry Coryell, guitar, will perform popular standards at the Windham Civic and Performing Arts Center in Windham. For reservations and more information, visit http://www.windhammusic.com/January_3.html.

Writers in the Mountains

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to write more, take a look at the variety of workshops offered by Writers in the Mountains: Creative Non-Fiction, Memoir, Poetry, Personal Essay, Playwriting, and other classes led by accomplished writers and educators. For more information, visit http://writersinthemountains.org/.