Category: collage

“The Arts Converge” – Mutual Muses in the Catskills

WRITERS IN THE MOUNTAINS (WIM)

PRESENTS

ARTIST – WRITER TALK SERIES

MUTUAL MUSES IN THE CATSKILLS

“THE ARTS CONVERGE”

THE MAURICE D. HINCHEY CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER

MT. TREMPER, NY

 

SATURDAY, MAY 27 AT 1 P.M.

Art Writer Simona David in Conversation with Painters Margaret Leveson and Lisbeth Firmin, Printmaker and Ceramicist Peter Yamaoka, and Textile Artist Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes

Art writer Simona David will discuss her latest book, How Art Is Made: In the Catskills (2017), and share the stage with several acclaimed artists who live and work in the Catskill Mountains: painters Margaret Leveson and Lisbeth Firmin, ceramicist and printmaker Peter Yamaoka and textile artist Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. How Art Is Made: In the Catskills pays homage to the place where American art was born through a series of conversations with creatives who live and work in the Catskills. Recent works will also be exhibited.

Artists featured in this book include sculptor Brian Tolle, known for The Irish Hunger Memorial in Battery Park City (2002), and more recently for Miss Brooklyn and Miss Manhattan, two replicas of Daniel Chester French originals that sit on the façade of the Brooklyn Museum – Tolle’s replicas were installed on Flatbush Avenue by the Manhattan Bridge in December 2016.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 AT 1 P.M.

Poet Sharon Israel in Performance and Conversation with Composer Robert Cucinotta

Composer Robert Cucinotta and poet and soprano Sharon Israel will discuss their unique roles as each other’s muses. Cucinotta will play electronic works inspired by Israel’s poems, feature the poet’s voice, or both. Israel will read from her new chapbook Voice Lesson, including poems set to music by Cucinotta or inspired by his compositions.

Israel is the host of Planet Poet–Words in Space, an edition of The Writer’s Voice on WIOX 91.3 FM in Roxbury, NY. Her debut chapbook Voice Lesson was published by Post Traumatic Press earlier this year, and her work has appeared in Per Contra, SPANK the CARP, 5:2 Crime Poetry Weekly, Medical Literary Messenger, and Spry Literary Journal. In 2016, Israel appeared as a panelist at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in Salem, MA.

Born in Brooklyn, Cucinotta studied composition and electronic music at the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College with Jacob Druckman, Robert Starer and Charles Dodge. His work MASQUE: the Tempest was premiered at the 2015 Phoenicia International Festival of the Voice by mezzo-soprano Maria Todaro, bass Bradley Smoak and pianist Doug Martin. Recent recordings include Divertimento For Mr. Brooks (2013), Koool Kitchen (2013), Dracula: Harker’s Journal (2014) and Life On The Screen (2016).

 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 AT 1 P.M.

Nature Writer Leslie T. Sharpe in Conversation with Photographer Rudd Hubbell

Photographer Rudd Hubbell, who’s been documenting the natural beauty of the Catskills since the 1970s, will be in conversation with nature writer Leslie T. Sharpe.

A descendent of the area’s first settlers, Hubbell has captured thousands of photographs of our spectacular wilderness. He enjoys looking closer than the broad view, and always tries to focus on the things most of us overlook or take for granted. “Every scene is constantly changing and transforming, and I strive to capture that,” Hubbell says.

Sharpe is a writer, editor and educator. A member of PEN American Center, she is the author of Editing Fact and Fiction: A Concise Guide to Book Editing (Cambridge University Press, 1994), which is regarded as a “modern editing classic” and “On Writing Smart: Tips and Tidbits,” featured in The Business of Writing (Allworth, 2012). Her new book, The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills (The Overlook Press, 2017), is a lyric narrative look at the wild animals of the Catskill Mountains. Sharpe will read from this work and discuss the genre of nature writing as it relates to the Catskills.

 

Writers in the Mountains is a 501 ( c ) (3) not-for-profit organization with a mission to provide a nurturing environment for the practice, appreciation and sharing of creative writing. For more information, visit writersinthemountains.org.

The Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center is a partnership between the Catskill Center and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, with generous financial support by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and Catskill Watershed Corporation and generous staff and volunteer support from Catskill Mountainkeeper, Catskill Mountain Club, Catskill 3500 Club, and the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. To learn more, visit catskillinterpretivecenter.org.

The Catskill Center has been promoting the Catskill Mountain Region through regional advocacy, environmental education, arts and culture programming, invasive species management, and land protection for over 45 years. The Center stimulates, conducts, and supports integrated actions to protect vital ecosystems and unique landscapes, to enhance economic opportunities for all the region’s residents, to preserve cultural and historic assets and to further a regional vision and spirit. For more information about the Catskill Center visit catskillcenter.org.

 

How Art Is Made: In the Catskills

bookcoverpreview-front

How Art Is Made: In the Catskills is a collection of interviews with some of the world’s most accomplished artists who live and work in the Catskill Mountains, New York. Five painters and illustrators, two ceramicists and printmakers, one sculptor, one weaver, and one writer discuss what inspires and moves them, what draws them to their medium of choice, what materials they use, how they approach a new artistic project, how they deal with setbacks, and how they celebrate success. Nine are formally trained at prestigious art schools; one is self-taught. What they all have in common is a rigorous studio practice, discipline, and the desire and curiosity to learn new things, and share them with the world.

Buy Online

Not to Miss This Weekend: AMR Open Studios Tour 2016

This weekend, Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31, from 11 am to 5 pm over twenty artists in Roxbury, Halcottsville, Margaretville, Fleischmanns, Halcott Center, Arkville, and Andes will open their studios to the public, and show their working spaces.

A good place to start the tour is the Wawaka (Halcottsville) Grange, which is true to its original function as a Grange and General Store. Refreshments, bathrooms, and handicap access are available at this location. Several artists will be showing at the Grange, including painters Sophia Maduri and Oneida Hammond.

Oneida Hammond with her watercolors and sketchbooks
Painter Oneida Hammond will be showing her watercolors again at the Grange in Halcottsville. © Simona David

Alix Travis, one of the founding members of the tour, will once again open her studio located at 103 Bragg Hollow Road in Halcottsville. An established plein air painter, Alix has received several awards and recognitions, including signature status in the Pennsylvania Watercolor Society and the NY Plein Air Painters. In 2014 she published The Catskill Coloring Book, which includes twenty-six of her plein air watercolor paintings. This weekend, during the open studios tour, Alix will paint en plein air, and will demonstrate some of her techniques.

Urban realist painter Lisbeth Firmin will be showing her oil paintings and monotype prints at her studio located in the Commons Building in Margaretville. Lisbeth is known for works such as Fifth Avenue (1995), and Woman on a Train (2014). Just recently she opened a new show at Rice – Polak Gallery in Provincetown, MA where she has been exhibiting for many years. Lisbeth asserts that her work is really not about the colors, but about the light and shadow in the composition.

22" x 30" monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY
Lisbeth Firmin’s Beckett Reading monoprint (2015). Contributed Photo.

Multi-media artist Alan Powell and painter Lesley Powell will be showing their work at 993 Main Street in Fleischmanns, and painter Anthony Margiotta will open his studio located at 355 Route 3 in Halcott Center. Margiotta, who does not have formal training as an artist, draws inspiration from his surroundings, whether be the woods of the Catskill Mountains or the urban scenes of New York City.

In Arkville, painter and printmaker Amy Masters, and architect and printmaker Ted Sheridan will be opening their studios located at 222 Chris Long Road. Over the past year or so Amy has been working on a series of monotype prints inspired by feathers. The fragility and the uniqueness of this object has captivated her, and she has decided to set and explore various shapes and tones that come with the printmaking process. Her husband Ted Sheridan will be showing a series of metallic prints capturing the oxidation process, and in so doing, retaining the most spectacular shapes and forms on paper.

Feather inspired prints by Amy Masters
Feather inspired prints by Amy Masters. © Simona David

Poet and furniture designer Gary Mead will be showing his gallery at 1289 South Side Road in Margaretville, and sculptor Ken Hiratsuka will be opening his barn at 34325 State Hwy 28 in Andes.

Heading back over to Roxbury, you’ll have the opportunity to stop by weaver Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes, whose studio is located at 424 Carr George Road in Denver. Tabitha has in her studio a professional loom, and happily demonstrates how to work the weft and create the density that is desired for a new piece. Weaving is one of the oldest forms of a blend of art and function,” she explains. “And it’s gratifying that it isn’t forgotten.”

In Roxbury painters Ellen Wong and Helene Manzo, photographer Frank Manzo, ceramicists and printmakers Peter Yamaoka and Gerda Van Leeuwen, and sculptor John Sanders will all show new works produced over the past year. Studio visits trigger questions that aren’t often asked in formal settings such as galleries and museums, and provide access to an intimate space that the artist doesn’t often share with others.

Artist Gerda Van Leeuwen in her studio in Roxbury
Artist Gerda Van Leeuwen in her studio in Roxbury. © Simona David

To learn more about the tour, read our feature story at https://artinthecatskills.com/2016/07/19/featured-destination-amr-open-studios-tour-2016/.

For maps and more information, visit http://www.amropenstudios.org. As you drive around this weekend, look for the “OPEN STUDIO” signs and brochures with maps available for pick up at various business sponsors and community supporters.

The AMR Open Studio Tour 2016 is funded by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Grant Program, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and is administered in Delaware County by The Roxbury Arts Group, and with fiscal support from The MARK Project and participating artists.

SPONSORED STORY

© 2016 Simona David

 

Featured Artist: Molly Rausch

Molly Rausch is a stamp artist. Her work has been exhibited throughout the Hudson Valley, New York City, Washington DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Barcelona, Oaxaca (Mexico), and Prilep (Macedonia), and is in numerous private and public collections. Molly’s work often deals with themes of communication and thresholds. She has participated in several public art projects, including a Lost and Found Drawing Booth in 2009. Her first museum exhibition was at the Museo de Filatelia in Oaxaca, Mexico in 2014. In 2015 she participated in the 58th Annual Contemporary Art Colony in Prilep, Macedonia: Molly’s work will be featured on an official Macedonian postage stamp in 2016. Molly holds an MFA in Painting from SUNY New Paltz, and a BA from St. Mary’s College in Maryland. She grew up in Maryland.

Turner Ship, 2 3/4" x 2 5/8", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
Turner Ship, 2 3/4″ x 2 5/8″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

Simona David: How did you become an artist?

Molly Rausch: It’s a tough question, because I don’t really know how does one become anything. But I’ve always loved drawing. I have three sisters, and we’re all about two years apart, so we’re a little bit of a competitive family. I remember when my oldest sister was given some oil pastels – they were given to her because she was considered the artist of the family. I remember I was very upset, I thought that was unfair. The only reason she was drawing better than me at the time was that she was four years older. And I really wanted to have those pastels. I think that you find what you love to do, and that’s what you end up doing.

SD: I believe Picasso said that all children are artists, the question is how to remain an artist once you grow up. Are your parents artists?

MR: My mom draws, and my dad is a wood worker, but they aren’t visual artists. My father is a doctor, and my mother is a teacher. But to answer your question, how does one remain an artist once one grows up, for me it was about establishing a studio practice when I studied art in school. How do you continue to make art? What are your requirements? How do you like to work?

SD: You have formal training as an artist. What does it mean to be formally trained as an artist? And do you have any mentors or influencers?

MR: As an undergraduate I majored in studio art. The art classes were the hardest, and that’s where I felt I was learning the most. As a graduate student at SUNY New Paltz I had some amazing art teachers. It was important to have concentrated time to work in the studio. Literally it’s just a practice: you go in, and practice, and figure out what your practice is going to be like. I remember seeing a Jacob Lawrence exhibition in college, and that’s what made me work in gouache. Otherwise, it’s just a slow evolution. I usually work in series, and one series leads to the next. It’s one step at a time.

The Oldest Story In The World, 3 x 3 3/8", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
The Oldest Story In The World, 3″ x 3 3/8″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: Do you always work from memory, or from photography, or with the subject matter in front of you? 

MR: I don’t like working from photography, I draw from observation. I like to see what happens when you try to depict things from observation and memory, and remember all the changes that happen. I have two main threads in my work right now: the postage stamp paintings, and a larger series of oils on plywood. For the postage stamp paintings I am using stamps as reference, but for the oil series I am working from observation.

SD: You are working both on very small works like the stamp paintings, and large ones like the oil paintings. It seems to me that it takes two different sets of skills to work on small and large scale. What do you think? 

MR: I like having both threads going, and bounce back and forth between the two.

Qbert, 3 1/8" x 2 7/8", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
Qbert, 3 1/8″ x 2 7/8″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: From the viewer’s perspective is different too: these are two very different kinds of experience. I have the feeling that I see more details in small works.

MR: When it comes to the postage stamp paintings, I really like having that intimacy, I like having something small that’s going to make someone walk up to the wall and get very close to see what’s going on. It changes the way one relates to the artwork. When it comes to a small piece of art, you can relate to it as if it were a book: you can pick it up and hold it in your hands. You’re going to relate in a completely different way to a large oil painting. You step further away. And it’s different when it comes to painting it as well. My large work is very simplified. When you think that something is bigger, you’d think there is more information on it.

SD: Let’s talk about the artistic process: how do you start a new project?

MR: I work in series. I’m usually inspired by some new material that I’m introduced to. I have the material, and I have a problem to solve: how am I going to use this material? I play around with it until I hit on something. I get excited, and I create a series. Maybe I have twenty – thirty pieces, and then it feels like it’s done, and I don’t feel like I’m learning anything new from it anymore. Then I look for new inspiration and some new material to work with.

SD: Now let’s talk about your postage stamp art. What triggered your interest in mail art?

MR: The postage stamp paintings started with a bookbinding project. In 1997 – 1998 I took a bookbinding class. I was working on this very tiny book about 3 inch square. I didn’t know what to put in it. And it sat empty for a year or so, and then I finally started to draw on it, and I messed up my drawing on my first page. I needed something to cover it up. And I had this envelope full of old letters and stamps that my dad had given me – my dad used to collect stamps. They were all early 1900s, very beautiful. And because they happened to be the right size, I glued a stamp down on this little book to cover my bad drawing, and it just looked really nice in there. Then I glued another one on the next page, but this one looked like it needed a little bit more space on one side of it. The composition of the stamp was too symmetrical for me, so I glued it down and extended the horizon a little bit. The next page I thought that it needed some sky, so I added a little bit of sky. You can look through this book, and see the ideas grow from there. By the fifth page I thought I might be into something. That led me to drawing up maps on pieces of plywood. I did a whole series of paintings on that. Those were large, like 3 by 4 feet.

Ramirez Train, 3 1/8" x 3 3/8", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
Ramirez Train, 3 1/8″ x 3 3/8″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: Were you familiar at the time with other stamp artists? I believe this movement was started by the Dadaists in the 1920s. You did explain how you make your stamp art: you start with a stamp, then you build around it, and you imagine a world outside that stamp, as if the stamp was larger, and included a larger scene.

MR: Yes. I glue down the stamp and I basically just paint around it. I don’t paint on it, and I don’t research it. I just stare at it for a while, and figure out the edges: I figure out what needs to go in the final composition. As far as the content goes, I feel like it’s already there for me, like I’m following the cues that are in the original work from the original artist. I work in watercolor and gouache. And, all my postage stamp paintings are actually about 3 by 3 inches, they’re very small. If you make them too big, then the illusion disappears. Right now as small as they are, there is a moment when people are looking at them, and actually they look at a few in a row, and then suddenly I hear them say “oh, there is a stamp in there.” It takes them a little bit to see it, and then they go back, and they go around the room, and say “oh, there is a stamp in everyone of them.” I really like that moment of discovery.

Mister Durand, 3 1/8" x 3", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
Mister Durand, 3 1/8″ x 3″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: What amazes me about your work is the color palette that you use: you manage to stay on the same color palette that’s on the original stamp, and the brushstroke is also similar to the stamp as if it was done by the same artist.

MR: I feel like the mockingbird of watercolors. I get to play with different styles. I am trying to match the style and the color of the stamp; people often ask me how I match the color.

SD: Just to clarify: each of these postage stamp paintings is unique: you don’t reproduce and you don’t make any prints. Is that right?

MR: Yes, that’s true.

SD: Do you name these postage stamp paintings?

MR: Some of them have titles. There was a series I did on currencies, and those had titles. Sometimes the title is important. But for the most part the titles that I make up are just descriptions of the subject, for example French castles.

SD: You currently have a show on view at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum (WAAM). What is included in this exhibition?

MR: There are twenty-nine paintings, about half of them painted this year. This is a series of postage stamp paintings that I started eighteen years ago. There is a stamp by Frederic Edwin Church for instance that I used in three different paintings, so it’s like a mini-series of paintings each of them less and less finished. I think of them as frames in some unknown film. This was the first time I had the same stamp on more than one painting. And I liked the idea of working in groups. There is also in there a series about currencies. This show will remain on view through January 3.

 Hudson River Church School 3, 3 x 3", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

Hudson River Church School 3, 3 x 3″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: You do other kind of work. You also work with typewriters. Let’s talk about that.

MR: I started this series of altered typewriter sculptures five or six years ago. It started with a joke: I was at work, and trying to write an email for some client that I was struggling with, and I made a joke to my co-workers like “I can’t find the sarcasm key on this computer.” At that point I had two typewriters – I still use the typewriter. So I started making these sculptures: take the keys off the typewriter, take all the letters off the keys, put other things in place, then put the typewriter back together. The first thing I made was a typewriter with all the letters blank except for the ones in the very middle where the letters “g” and “h” would be, and just says “yes” and “no.” Sometimes you just want to simplify things, and make them that binary, you just need an answer “yes” or “no.” There is a typewriter I made where all the keys say “me,” “me,” “me.” We’re all guilty of this sometimes. I made another typewriter where I took the “Shift” key off it, and made it “Sarcasm” key. The typewriters are fully functional – I didn’t actually alter the striking key: it doesn’t actually type “yes,” or “no,” or “me.” They still do what they’re supposed to do, they still type the regular alphabet, which is important to me conceptually, because I’m interested in this illusion we have about communication, and how you think you can only talk about one thing, you think you can only say “yes” or “no,” but in reality you could actually say whatever you want to. To me typewriters are beautiful, not just as mechanical objects, but I love the alphabet and the fact that twenty-six letters can be re-arranged to say anything and everything.

SD: What you said made me think of Marshall McLuhan’s famous assertion that “the medium is the message.” You like to write using either a pen, or a typewriter, or a computer. Does each of this medium trigger a different choice of words or perhaps a different thought process?

MR: It’s completely different. There is no editing when it comes to typewriters. I feel like the typewriter is the purist because on a computer I can edit everything, whereas with the typewriter I need more stream of consciousness. With the typewriter whatever comes out in whatever order is what it is, that’s it. Just like talking live on the radio.

SD: You’ve shown your work in many exhibitions throughout North America and Europe. What do these shows mean to you? Earlier this year you participated in an arts residency in Macedonia. What was your experience like? What did you learn?    

MR: It’s always a thrill, it’s always an honor. It’s nice to get things out of my studio, and have other people see them. The opportunity to travel to go to Macedonia this year was amazing.

SD: Talk a little bit about what it means to get ready for a new show.

MR: I remember the first series of paintings that I made, it was very personal. I could never imagine ever parting with these paintings. I also remember thinking that I’d like to be able to show my work, and I can’t hang onto everything forever, and start making things that aren’t so personal. It’s about learning to let go of your artwork and send it out in the world, but there are a few pieces in each series that I think like “no, this one isn’t going anywhere, this one is mine.”

Crop Circles, 3" x 2 3/4", watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch
Crop Circles, 3″ x 2 3/4″, watercolor, gouache, postage stamp, 2015 by Molly Rausch

SD: What are you working on now?

MR: I’m working on a project trying to combine chalk board painting with concrete and piano roll paper. I’m working on a series of larger paintings on plywood that incorporate these three materials. I also have an exhibition coming up next year in New Haven, Connecticut, and I’m working on postage stamp paintings for them. I might include typewriters in this show as well, because the show will be hosted at the Library Institute, a beautiful, old library in New Haven. I’m imaging the postage stamp paintings on the walls and the typewriters set in the middle of the room.

You can find more about Molly Rausch at http://www.mollyrausch.com. You can find more about Molly’s postage stamp paintings at http://postagestamppaintings.com/about/.

© 2015 Simona David

Weekend in the Catskills – 12/25/2015

This weekend:

  • Stamp artist Molly Rausch is showing at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum (WAAM);
  • Samuel F. B. Morse’s Locust Grove Mansion is open for holiday tours;
  • And, the Open Eye Theater in Margaretville presents A Child’s Christmas in Wales by Welsh poet Dylan Thomas.

Read more at Upstater.com.

stamp

Featured Artist: Lisbeth Firmin

Lisbeth Firmin. Contributed photo.
Lisbeth Firmin. Contributed photo.

Lisbeth Firmin was born in Paducah, Kentucky in 1949. She is a contemporary American realist known for her urban landscapes. For over four decades her work has been in hundreds of solo and group shows across the country and internationally. There was a retrospective exhibition at the Taft School in Watertown, CT in 2011, featuring painting and prints from 1994-2010. In 2010, Firmin’s monoprint, “Heading to Work, Varick Street” won ‘Best in Show’ in WSKG’s annual Art in Motion Competition in Binghamton, NY. Her paintings were included in the 2009 Winter Issue, Stone Canoe Review, Syracuse University. She was cover artist for the 2008 spring issue of Epoch, Cornell University’s literary magazine and was the featured artist in the 2008 summer issue of the Gettysburg Review. Her urban landscape paintings were included in “Five Women Artists in New York,” curated by Ken Ratner, Flushing Town Hall, 2008. Awards include a 2007 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for printmaking (Lily Auchincloss Fellow) and a Merit Award at the 2007 Roberson Regional Art Exhibition, Binghamton, NY, juried by Philip Pearlstein. Firmin was awarded a Community Arts Funding Grant, New York State Council on the Arts in 2007. Other awards include a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, the New York Print Club Emerging Artist Award, the CCVA Award at the Chautauqua Center for the Visual Arts, first prize in the LANA International Arts Competition; along with full fellowships to the MacDowell Colony, National Seashore Residency, the Vermont Studio Center and Saltonstall Arts Colony. She was a guest artist (printmaking) at the Vermont Studio Center from 2001 to 2004, working with master printer Sarah Amos.

Selected publications include: Provincetown Arts, American Artist, American Art Collector, McDougal Littell/LITERATURE, The Boston Globe, Art and Auction, Art of Our Town, The New York Times, Arts Magazine, The Banner (Provincetown), The Albuquerque Journal, and The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

I spoke with Lisbeth Firmin in her studio in Margaretville, New York.

Simona David: How did you become an artist?

Lisbeth Firmin: This is a picture of me at three. I’m left-handed, and seriously trying to stay in the lines. I started my brilliant career right there.

Lisbeth Firmin as a three-year old. Contributed photo.

SD: One could say that you were born with an innate talent.

LF: What I can say is that I could draw since I could remember. I could always draw something that looked like something. Kids love to draw, and they all draw the same way when they’re young. But when they get older, they want to draw something that looks like something, and can’t – and that’s the difference: I could always do it. So I kept on doing it.

SD: Did your parents notice immediately that you had this amazing talent?

LF: Not immediately, but I started winning scholarships when I was 10 or 11 years old. I was sent to an art institute where we lived. I was sent there with these teenagers and 20 year old artists, and I was only 12. That was an eye-opener.

SD: Were you a mature child, or everybody knew you were just a 12 year old?

LF: Everybody knew, but I was accepted because I could draw, and my drawing had this vigor in it. I was full of energy, and even at that age I had a style of my own.

SD: You already had your own style when you were 12. After forty years of artistic career, do you think you still maintain something of that style?

LF: Yes. I think so.

SD: Do you have formal training as an artist?

LF: No. I won these scholarships to art institutes – one in Indianapolis and one in Los Angeles. I wanted to go to art school, but my father wasn’t going to pay for it – he didn’t think I was serious about it. It was also the late 1960s, and everything was falling apart. I went to the University of California at Santa Barbara for a year in a liberal arts program, and took as much art as I could. I took just exactly what I wanted to take, and got really good grades. The second year I didn’t go back.

SD: So you continued to be self-taught, and continued to draw and paint.

LF: Yes, constantly. It just poured out of me. I was doing all kinds of things: I was doing prints, and drawings, and collages. I didn’t have my subject matter down. What draws me is painting what I see – translating what I see into a painting or a drawing.

22" x 30" monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY
Reading Beckett, 22″ x 30″ monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY

SD: During your formative period were you working with other artists to develop your skills? Or perhaps you had someone in mind you wanted to emulate?

LF: Artists have this kind of creative bent. And I’ve always been curious, and always had a ton of energy. When I was in Provincetown I studied with Philip Malicoat. He was good friends with Edwin Dickinson, a very good painter, who is in a lot of big collections. I spent a winter working with Malicoat in his studio. He taught me how to paint, and how to lay out the palette. That was in the 1970s.

SD: You spent the 1970s in Provincetown, in a bohemian artistic community. Talk about that period in your life and career.

LF: I believe the hayday of that artistic community was a bit earlier when Hans Hofmann was around, and everybody from New York City came up, Pollock, everybody. I lived in Provincetown for a decade. I worked in the theater there. I was also painting a lot, and selling: my friends were buying my work. I was also a street artist for a time: I was doing portraits for tourists. It was an amazing period.

SD: In the early 1980s you moved to New York City. Let’s talk about your artistic trajectory in the Big Apple.

LF: It’s funny. I was visiting friends in New York City, and had my trunk full of collages I was bringing as gifts to my friends. I was stopped in front of a gallery, and the gallery owner saw the collages, and offered me a show. I thought if that was that easy to get a show in New York City, I’d stay. It was a great show, it got great reviews.

SD: That was in 1978 at Marie Pelliconi Gallery in New York City, a show called Souvenir Collages.

LF: Yes. I had twenty collages in that show. It got Holly Solomon interested in my work, which is a pretty big deal, but I wasn’t ready.

Garbage Truck/Snowstorm, 5" x 5", gouache, 1996, owned by Dympna Burkhart
Garbage Truck/Snowstorm, 5″ x 5″, gouache, 1996, owned by Dympna Burkhart
Fifth Avenue, 7" x 15", gouache, 1995
Fifth Avenue, 7″ x 15″, gouache, 1995

SD: What happened next?

LF: I guess there is a big gap in my resume. From 1979 to mid 1980s I was just trying to survive and bring up my daughter. I got a job as a graphic designer that was paying a decent salary. I would paint at night after my daughter went to bed. At one point I did a whole series on cockroaches, because we had so many of them. I was also doing some landscape, some subway stuff. I was doing all work on paper. I didn’t start painting in oil until the late 1980s. Back then I was doing gouaches or collages, all kinds of images.

SD: And in the late 1980s you started to paint in oil.

LF: Yes. What happened was that I was trying to decide what I was going to do, and I walked out of my apartment on Sullivan Street, and I said that’s it: I’m going to paint what I see. I did thirty gouaches – small 10 x 10 gouaches. I had an open studio party, and I sold every single one of my paintings. I knew I was into something, and I had so much fun doing it. I was painting things I didn’t know I could paint: police horses, cabs, people – people started to appear in my paintings. My career just started to take off, right after that.

SD: Taking off, like showing in galleries?

LF: Yes. I started working in oil paint, and showing urban landscapes in galleries. And people started buying them. I began to do one new show every year. I was producing a ton of work at this point, and had some big names interested in me like Allan Stone.

Couple With Child, 7th Avenue South, 20" x 20" oil on wood panel, 2003, retail: $3500
Couple With Child, 7th Avenue South, 20″ x 20″, oil on wood panel, 2003
oil on wood panel, 20" x 20", 2012, Retail: $3800
Three Guys, Downtown Philly, 20″ x 20″, oil on wood panel,  2012

SD: Nowadays you also make monoprints. What is the process?

LF: I work on plexiplates, and apply ink, and then use rags to create a pattern; I press on paper, then pull out the print, and clean the plexiplate for future use. I learned to do this at Parsons: I took a class there in 1991. It’s an amazing medium, it’s called the painterly print.

SD: Talk about these two monoprints you have here.

LF: I made these in the early 1990s. I come from a small town in Maine called Eastport. They have an art institute there – Tides Institute. In 2013 they offered me a show – these monoprints were shown there in an exhibit called Coming Home.

SD: How do you choose what to work on? How do you decide what comes next?

LF: I can’t explain that. It’s a visceral thing. I could be walking around, and doing grocery shopping or some other mundane stuff like that. And I see something, and I say “I want to paint that.” I don’t even verbalize it. It’s more like “I could paint that, I want to paint that.” Now I always have my iPhone with me. And what’s happening these days is that I see something about the light on a figure, and this is what interests me. And it is just coming naturally to me these days: I know where to put the paint, and how to capture the light. I’m moving away from buildings and streetscapes.

SD: What role do colors play in your approach?

LF: It’s a good question. But honestly it’s not about the colors. It’s more about the light and the shadow: that’s what gets me. For instance, last year I was in Barcelona and painted this woman on the street: I wanted to get her in the dark, in the shadow of those buildings, and moving towards the corner of the street where the light was blasting. It was the light – I knew I wanted to paint the light, not the color. Generally I paint with pretty muted colors.

Woman Walking, Barcelona. 22" x 30" monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY
Woman Walking, Barcelona, 22″ x 30″ monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY

SD: Talk about your style. You describe yourself as a realist painter. Some have called you an expressionist realist. 

LF: It is realism – old-fashioned realism, but somehow unique. What I notice every time I’m in a group show is that my work never looks like anybody else’s.

SD: What kinds of works are usually exhibited along with yours?

LF: I enter various competitions like this show at the Bonner David Galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona called What’s Your Favorite City? Or various shows upstate New York like for instance Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region at the Hyde Collection Museum in Glens Falls, or the 63rd Exhibition of the Central New York Artists at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica. My work just never looks like anybody else’s work.

SD: Would you name any artist as being influential to your work?

LF: I have painters that I really admire. When I started painting the City I compared myself to John Sloan and George Bellows and all those guys known as The Eight. I was painting the streets of Manhattan, just like they were doing a hundred years earlier. So I thought I was carrying on that tradition. But I think my work has evolved beyond that.

SD: You’ve been represented by the same dealer for quite some time now.

LF: Yes. I’m lucky. My dealer has stayed with me for 15 years while transitioning from urban landscape to figural painting. Her name is Marla Rice. She owns Rice- Polack Gallery in Provincetown, where I sell a lot of work.

SD: How does your work make you feel?

LF: I know that when I work for about a year or so to produce new works for a show, and then they’re gone and the walls are empty, I don’t like it and feel compelled to fill up those walls again.

SD: What kind of feedback do you get from your followers?

LF: What I do is so instinctive, yet it seems to have an emotional connection with the public. I know that I’m emotionally repressed, but I think it comes out through my paintings. People tell me they get an emotional reaction to my paintings.

SD: Talk a bit about the artistic process.

LF: I’m mixing the colors to get it right, and that takes a long time, because I mix all the colors that I want to use, and then I start painting and I’m still in the real world, but then after about an hour I’m not in the real world anymore. I am somewhere else – I don’t even know what time it is. I’m just in this amazing mindset, I can’t even describe it.

SD: How has your style changed over the years?

LF: It’s hard for me to say. The medium is the same – a lot of work in gouache on paper, but the subject matter is different. And the brushstroke has gotten more confident, I guess.

SD: What are you working on now?

LF: I’m preparing a show for 2016 in Provincetown. I show there every other year. Over half of the new oils I showed last year sold.

SD: Do you have a favorite painting?

LF: Every once in a while a new painting will come out that is magical. I don’t know where it comes from. “Woman on A Train,” painted last year, was such a painting. Everyone who saw it was moved by it. It sold before the show opened: Marla told me she could have sold this painting twenty times.

Woman on a Train, 20" x 20" oil on wood panel, 2014
Woman on a Train, 20″ x 20″, oil on wood panel, 2014

SD: You’ve received many awards and recognitions such as the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Printmaking in 2007, the Chautauqua Center for the Visual Arts Award in 2003, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship in 2000, a Manhattan Arts International Award of Excellence in 2000, a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1999, and many others. What do these recognitions mean to you?

LF: Every time I win something I feel like I am on the right road. I feel like I have something special to give, and I just want to keep it pure, and give it. I also think all these early awards came to the right time to propel me to push myself to the next level.

SD: Your work is in many collections, including the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica, New York Historical Society in New York City, Vermont Studio Center, but also corporate collections such as Thomson Reuters and Barclay Investments in New York City. That must be feeling really good.

LF: Yes. Some of these works were done on commission for corporate collections.

SD: You’ve been shown in many solo and group shows all over the country and internationally. What are some of your favorite moments?

LF: What I really like about being shown in galleries is that it pushes me to meet deadlines. I know I have to have a certain amount of work done by a certain date, and I’m enjoying the need to produce.

To learn more about Lisbeth Firmin, visit http://www.lisbethfirmin.com/.

All the photographs were contributed by the artist.

© 2015 Simona David

Weekend in the Catskills – 7/24/2015

This weekend in the Catskills:

  • Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett at Bethel Woods;
  • One Hundred Years of Maverick Concerts in Woodstock;
  • The AMR Open Studios Tour in Roxbury and Margaretville;
  • And A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival.

Read article at Upstater.com.

Big Red Kill by Patrice Lorenz
Big Red Kill by Patrice Lorenz, participant in the AMR Open Studios