Category: modern art

Featured Destination: The Hyde Collection

The Hyde Collection Art Museum in Glens Falls, Warren County, includes a wide array of artworks and antiques – paintings, sculptures, pottery, books and furniture – spanning from the early Renaissance to modern and contemporary era. The collection was established by Charlotte Pruyn Hyde and her husband Louis Fiske Hyde, who acquired art from the Renaissance to the 19th century. Later on, the collection expanded to include 20th century modern and contemporary works.

The Hyde Collection
The Hyde Collection Art Museum. Source: Facebook

Housed in the Hydes’ 1912 American Renaissance mansion, the collection includes works by Italian Renaissance masters Domenico Tintoretto, Raphael, and Sandro Botticelli; Spanish Renaissance painter, sculptor and architect El Greco; Baroque painters Peter Paul Rubens and Rembrandt van Rijn; French Neo-Classical painter Ingres; French Impressionists Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir; Post-Impressionist painters like Paul Cézanne and Vincent Van Gogh, as well as modern painters such as Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. American masters including Winslow Homer are also represented in the collection. In addition to its permanent holdings, the museum hosts temporary exhibitions and other educational programs.

Because of its growing collection, in the 1980s the Museum expanded with a large Education Wing, comprised of three galleries, an auditorium, an art studio as well a storage and visitor amenities area, complementing the adjacent historic Hyde House.

In 2015 we interviewed Erin Coe, then executive director at The Hyde Collection – Coe is currently director of the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State. In 2013, while at The Hyde Collection, Coe organized the acclaimed O’Keeffe and Lake George exhibition in association with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which brought together 58 paintings from public and private collections, created between 1918 and 1934, when O’Keeffe summered at Lake George in the company of Alfred Stieglitz and his family. In fact, Coe co-authored the book Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George, which presented groundbreaking scholarship that shed new light on O’Keeffe’s work.

Albert Bierstadt
Albert Bierstadt, Yosemite Valley (1865), oil on canvas, 21 3/4 x 30 in. Source: The Hyde Collection

Painters affiliated with the Hudson River School of Painting, founded by Thomas Cole in 1825 and considered the first authentic American art movement, had painted at Lake George, including Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, John F. Kensett, Sanford Gifford, and others. The Hyde Collection’s most significant Hudson River School painting in its permanent collection is a painting by Albert Bierstadt, who did not paint at Lake George, however. His Yosemite Valley oil on canvas, painted in 1865, is on display at The Hyde Collection in the Downstairs Guest Room. Because of his interest in the West, Bierstadt is often grouped with the Rocky Mountain School as well. In the 1850s, he studied in Düsseldorf, under the influence of the prestigious Düsseldorf Academy, characterized by detailed, plein air paintings in muted colors. Düsseldorf School exercised influence over the Hudson River School.

In the summer of 2015, The Hyde Collection hosted the exhibition The Late Drawings of Andy Warhol: 1973 – 1987, organized in partnership with The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburg. Drawing was critical to Warhol’s development as an artist from his early years as an art student to the last few days of his life in 1987. The show included fifty large drawings from the artist’s late period. It was a prolific time in Warhol’s life, when the artist used as inspiration celebrities, flowers, and ads, as seen in his most iconic works. Some of these drawings were shown for the first time at The Hyde Collection. The show drew visitors from all over the world and across the United States.

Currently on view is a modern art exhibition dedicated to Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Fernand Léger, which explores exclusively the three artists’ work as printmakers. Organized by Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions, the show includes Picasso’s print series Suite des Saltimbanques (1904-1905) and Le Cocu Magnifique (1968), Braque’s L’Ordre des Oiseaux (1962), and Léger’s Les Illuminations (1950). The exhibition will remain on view through January 5, 2020.

The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 12 noon to 5 p.m.

For more information about The Hyde Collection, and current hours of operation, visit http://www.hydecollection.org/.

161 Warren Street, Glens Falls, NY 12801

(518) 792-1761

Chagall in High Falls – The Virginia Project

The Virginia Project

Famed Surrealist painter Marc Chagall, known for works such as I and the Village (1911), Paris through the Window (1913), and Green Violinist (1923), lived and worked in High Falls between 1946 and 1948, producing a significant number of works. At that time, Chagall was accompanied by his lover Virginia Haggard, an artist in her own right, her young daughter from a previous marriage, Jean McNeil, as well as their newly born son David.

Chagall spent six years in New York between 1942 and 1948, a productive time when he painted, but also designed costumes for the American Ballet Theatre and The Metropolitan Opera, murals for the Lincoln Center, and stained-glass windows for the United Nations headquarters.

In 1946 he moved to High Falls where he spent the next two years. Local author Tina Barry created a collaborative called The Virginia Project, pairing poems with visual works by 14 women artists to shed light and reignite interest in that time in Chagall’s life in the United States. Of particular interest to her were Virginia and her daughter Jean.

The show opens today, October 27 at 5 pm at Wired Gallery in High Falls, and will remain on view through November 25.

Read full article in Chronogram.

Books We Love: Peggy Guggenheim, The Shock of the Modern by Francine Prose

Peggy Guggenheim: The Shock of the Modern (2015)

By Francine Prose, Yale University Press, 211 pp.

 

Best-selling author Francine Prose, known for nonfiction titles like Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and Reading Like a Writer, wrote a heartfelt biography of Peggy Guggenheim, influential art collector, and early promoter of Modernism in America. Well-ahead of her time, Peggy developed a taste for the avant-garde and unconventional that followed her throughout the entire life. She altered the course of art history in an unprecedented manner by meticulously pursuing new styles and supporting emerging artists.

Born in New York City in August 1898 to a wealthy family, Peggy Guggenheim developed an interest in art at an early age. Her father, Benjamin Guggenheim, perished on the Titanic in 1912, leaving Peggy with a comfortable inheritance. Her mother Florette Seligman, who came from a prominent banking family, also left Peggy with a considerable inheritance, allowing for a sophisticated, privileged lifestyle.

“A Guggenheim, or a Strauss, or a Seligman was expected to be meticulously well mannered and to avoid anything that might be considered ostentatious or vulgar,” explains Francine Prose in her biography of Peggy Guggenheim (p. 37).

As a child, Peggy traveled frequently to Europe with her mother Florette where they stayed at stylish hotels, and learned about art, French history, British literature, and German opera, explains Prose.

In 1920 Peggy moved back to Europe, “in a frenzy to see great art.” “She knew where every important painting was located and insisted on seeing them all” (p. 60).

From 1922 to 1928 Peggy was married to Laurence Vail, a French-born American playwright, novelist, and painter who belonged to the Dada movement. Peggy’s life, relates Prose, had “periods of intense travel interrupted by interludes during which she established and oversaw large bohemian households in Paris, in London, and in rural beauty spots in England and France” (p. 17).

After her failed marriage with Vail, Peggy engaged in notorious affairs with playwright Samuel Beckett, sculptor Constantin Brancusi, and Surrealist painter Max Ernst, whom she married in 1941 – the marriage would end in divorce five years later.

Peggy’s uncle Solomon Guggenheim, who also was an avid collector of modern art, might have been an inspiration to Peggy: Solomon and his mistress, artist and art advisor Baroness Hilla von Rebay opened The Museum of Non-Objective Painting in New York in 1937 to display Solomon’s growing collection which included works by Kandinsky, Chagall, Picasso, and many others. As the collection kept growing, the effort eventually led to the opening of Guggenheim Museum in 1959 at its current location on Fifth Avenue in a building designed by famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

While in Europe, Peggy opened Guggenheim Jeune gallery in London in 1938, an unfortunate time, as WWII was about to break out the following year. Peggy had traveled to Paris the year before to secure art for the opening show. She had hoped to open the gallery with an exhibition dedicated to Constantin Brancusi, but the Romanian sculptor was out of town at the time, and Peggy turned her attention to Jean Cocteau. Guggenheim Jeune opened in January 1938 with a show dedicated to Cocteau – the gallery would close in August 1939 due to the war outbreak. In fact, Peggy had plans to open an art museum in London in the fall of 1939, when the war broke, and she had to return to New York.

In June 1941 Peggy and her family sailed from Marseille to New York, bringing with them Peggy’s significant collection of modern art which included 150 works by artists such as Kandinsky, Klee, Mondrian, Braque, Miro, Dali, Magritte, Giacometti, Brancusi, and Max Ernst, works that could have not safely remained in Europe. At first, Peggy had hoped that the Louvre Museum in Paris might have sheltered some of the works, but the museum directors considered the art “too modern to merit saving,” as Prose relates.

Back in New York, Peggy opened Art of This Century gallery, which shortly became the city’s cultural center. The gallery functioned from 1942 to 1947, when Peggy returned to Europe. Alexander Calder, Georgia O’Keefe, and Jackson Pollock frequented the space which was at once “a cultural landmark and a tourist attraction” (p. 137). Peggy helped launch Pollock’s career at Art of this Century – the artist showed four times at the gallery during its existence, and drew the attention of art critics such as Robert Coates at the New Yorker, and Clement Greenberg at The Nation.

In 1943 the gallery hosted the first exhibition of collages in the United States. Also, “among the most remarkable aspects of Art of This Century,” writes Prose, “was the unusual amount of attention paid to women artists” (p. 140). She goes on to say: “equally striking is how few of these women – Frida Kahlo, Louise Bourgeois, and Leonora Carrington – went on to develop careers and reputations remotely approaching those of their male contemporaries” (p. 141).

In addition to promoting emergent artists, as Prose relates, the gallery “was used as a background for fashion shoots in Vogue and Glamour, and was the subject of a photo feature in the New York Times Magazine” (p. 138).

In 1946, when Peggy was 48 years old, she published her memoir Out of This Century, which Prose calls “a remarkable document.” “It is hard to think of an important visual artist from the first half of the twentieth century who does not appear in its pages, in the company of an impressive number of celebrated novelists, memoirists, and poets” (p. 11). Several pages are dedicated to Peggy’s “battle to acquire Brancusi’s Bird in Space.”

In 1947 Peggy returned to Europe, and bought Palazzo Vernier dei Leoni in Venice. Her collection was swiftly included in the 24th Venice Biennale in 1948, one of the most prestigious art shows in the world. Afterwards, the collection traveled to Florence, Milan, Amsterdam, Brussels, and Zurich, before returning to Venice in 1951, and being permanently housed at Palazzo Vernier dei Leoni. Among luminaries spending time with Peggy while in Venice, Prose mentions Surrealist painter Marc Chagall, Beat poet Allen Ginsberg, and experimental composer John Cage.

In 1969 Guggenheim Museum in New York showed a large part of Peggy’s collection, which remains one of the most important in the world. To learn more about Peggy Guggenheim Collection, visit https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/site/peggy-guggenheim-collection.

Weekend in the Catskills – 3/4/2016

This weekend:

  • “American Stories” exhibition at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center in Poughkeepsie includes works by iconic American artists such as Sanford Gifford, William Merritt Chase, and Georgia O’Keefe;
  • Woodstock writer and musician Robert Burke Warren launches his debut novel Perfectly Broken at the Kleinert / James Center for the Arts;
  • And illustrator Loel Barr teaches a Handmade Books as Art workshop at the Woodstock School of Art.

Learn more at Upstater.com.

Art in the Catskills En Voyage

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Alexander Calder at JFK
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In Zürich, Switzerland
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Fraumünster Church was built in 853 in the Romanesque style. Stained glass windows by Giacometti, and Chagall were installed in 1940, and 1970 respectively.
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The Gates of Hell by Auguste Rodin at Kunsthaus, Swiss Art Museum
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The prestigious Montreux Jazz Festival takes place every summer by Lake Geneva
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In 2015 Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga performed at Montreux Jazz Festival. They also performed in the Catskills at Bethel Woods (read my article in Upstater).
Bucharest
Bucharest’s Historic District
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The Wine Museum in Dragasani, Romania
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Novelist Gib Mihaescu’s home in Dragasani, Romania
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Mihaescu’s telescope in his study
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Paintings by young Romanian artist George Enescu (yes, the same name as the great classical composer)

© 2015 Simona David

Weekend in the Catskills – 5/1/2015

May Day, Park Day, Independent Bookstore Day, Kentucky Derby, and superb weather this weekend – many reasons to celebrate.

Thomas Cole National Historic Site & Olana State Historic Site

Olana Estate. Contributed Photo.
Olana Estate. Contributed Photo.

Thomas Cole National Historic Site in partnership with Olana State Historic Site are co-hosting River Crossings: Contemporary Art Comes Home, an exhibition that opens this Sunday, May 3 at both sites. The exhibition, featuring twenty-eight contemporary artists inspired by the works of Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church, is the first major collaboration between the two institutions, and the first event since the 19th century when contemporary artists are invited to present their works in these settings. Artists such as Chuck Close, Martin Puryear, Lynn Davis, Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Maya Lin, Stephen Hannock, and Jerry Gretzinger are among those featured in this show. For more information, visit http://www.rivercrossings.org/.

Hudson Opera

Hudson Opera House in Hudson, Columbia County, is hosting a classical music concert this Sunday, May 3 at 3 p.m. Mozart and Friends: Musical Wonderland featuring world class musicians from the Preparatory Division of The Bard College Conservatory of Music: soprano Amy Palomo, clarinetist Nicholas Lewis, and pianist Renana Gutman. Talented young musicians will also perform under the tutelage of these accomplished artists, and will be exposed to performing in a professional setting. This is a free concert for the entire family. For more information, visit http://hudsonoperahouse.org/2013/11/30/bard-preparatory-division-family-concert-sunday-may-3-at-3pm/.

Writers in the Mountains

Writers in the Mountains (WIM) presents Writing Fiction Today – Literary vs. Genre Fiction: Real Distinction or No Difference at All? Sunday, May 3 at 1 p.m. at the Golden Notebook Bookstore in Woodstock, Ulster County. The event is co-sponsored by Glaring Omissions Writing Group, one of the longest-running critique groups in the Hudson Valley. Moderator Jenny Milchman will lead a conversation with panelists Elizabeth Brundage, Alison Gaylin, and Peter Golden as they question the foundation that lies beneath bookstore shelving, library categorization, and the ways we define words on a page. For more information, visit http://writersinthemountains.org/.

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Bardavon Theatre

Bardavon Theatre in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, is hosting a classical music concert this Saturday, May 2 at 8 p.m. featuring the Hudson Valley Philharmonic conducted by Randall Craig Fleischer. The orchestra will perform Brahms’ Requiem and Haydn’s Symphony No. 44. Over one hundred and fifty instrumentalists and singers will perform, including the Vassar Choir and Cappella Festiva directed by Christine Howlett. Fleischer will deliver a pre-concert talk at 7 p.m. For more information, visit https://bardavon.org/event_info.php?id=736&venue=bardavon.

Bannerman Castle

Bannerman Castle, located on Pollepel Island, in the proximity of Fishkill, Dutchess County, is an architectural gem built in 1901 by businessman Francis Bannerman. Bannerman designed the building himself. While the castle is currently under renovation, the island is open to the public by guided tours only. To embark on a tour, visitors meet at the Beacon Institute Dock. The first tour of the season will take place this Saturday, May 2 at 11 a.m. The tour is two and a half hour long. For more information, visit http://www.bannermancastle.org.

Also, Vassar College is open for campus tours this Saturday, May 2 at 1 p.m. Lyle Lovett will perform at the Ulster Performing Arts Center in Kingston Sunday, May 3 at 7 p.m. Bard College Conservatory Orchestra is having the last concert of the season Saturday, May 2 at 8 p.m.

© 2015 artinthecatskills.com

Weekend in the Catskills – 3/13/15

With temperatures in the mid 40s this weekend, be sure to enjoy the first real signs of spring here in the Catskills. But here’s what is going on in the area.

The Hyde Collection Art Museum  

The Hyde Collection Art Museum in Glens Falls, Warren County, is hosting the final weekend of The Stone Palette: Lithographs in 19th Century France, an exhibit showcasing black and white, and color prints in a variety of styles and techniques. The exhibit explores lithography as an artistic medium booming throughout the 1800s. Lithography was invented in 1796 in Germany by playwright Alois Senefelder. Towards the end of the 19th century lithographs, particularly those in color, revolutionized the advertising and publishing industries. For more information about The Stone Palette, go to http://www.hydecollection.org/exhibitions/The_Stone_Palette_Lithographs_in_19th-Century_France_501.htm.

Clermont Estate

Clermont Estate presents a corset history lecture Building Fashion from Inside Out, this Saturday, March 14 at 2:30 p.m. Costume historian Kjirsten Gustavson will be talking about two hundred years of corset history and styles. Live models will demonstrate some of the garments and their effect on clothing’s appearance. The event will take place at the Hudson Opera House in Hudson, Columbia County. For more information about this event, visit http://www.friendsofclermont.org/.

Dia:Beacon

Dia:Beacon in Beacon, Dutchess County, is hosting a Gallery Talk this Saturday, March 14 at 2 p.m. Andrianna Campbell, a doctoral student at CUNY, will discuss the work of Robert Smithson, a mid-20th century artist who belonged to the so-called land art movement. For more information about this talk, visit http://www.diaart.org/events/main/649.

Spillian

Spillian mansion, located in Fleishmanns, Ulster County will be hosting its now well-established Voices from the Catskills event this Sunday, March 15 at 4 p.m. The program includes a jazz recital with saxophonist Eric Rosen, singer and pianist Nina Sheldon, and bassist Rich Syracuse. Dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. The menu this Sunday includes Guinness beef stew, vegan root vegetable stew, green salad, and Irish soda bread in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. For more information about this event, go to https://www.facebook.com/events/562493780520738/.

Pine Hill Community Center

Pine Hill Community Center in Pine Hill, Ulster County, is hosting Catskill Cabaradio, a quarterly variety program broadcast live on WIOX Roxbury, Saturday, March 14 at 7 p.m. The program includes storytelling with Mary Savage, music with Elly Wininger and the Pine Hill Playboys, and much more. There will be a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. For more information, visit http://pinehillcommunitycenter.org/events/.

Enjoy a gorgeous Catskills weekend!