Book Reading Event at Roxbury General

Novelist Annie DeWitt and photographer Jerome Jakubiec spoke about their widely praised books “White Nights in Split Town City” and “I Actually Wore This: Clothes We Can’t Believe We Bought” at Roxbury General on Small Business Saturday, Nov. 25 this year.

© 2017 Simona David

The Los Angeles Review of Books depicts “White Nights in Split Town City” as “the story of what it means to feel desired and plugged into what surrounds us, and how this informs our identities from a very young age.” The book was released by Tyrant Books in August 2016.

The New Yorker describes “I Actually Wore This” as “Funny and surprisingly touching, revealing much about our moments of bold, optimistic self-assertion and their aftermath.” The book was released by Rizzoli in March 2017.

Both books are available at Roxbury General along with a vast array of merchandise from clothing and ceramics to sweets and holiday decorations.

© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David

DeWitt and Jakubiec live and work in Roxbury.

 

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The Irish Hunger Memorial Re-Opens to the Public

The Irish Hunger Memorial. Contributed Photo.

The Irish Hunger Memorial, a public art project designed by sculptor Brian Tolle in Battery Park City, re-opened to the public late last summer after undergoing major renovations to address damage caused by water infiltration in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Originally built in the early 2000s, the monument opened for the first time on July 16, 2002. Roberta Smith from The New York Times described the monument as a “typically postmodern blend of existing art styles — Realism, Conceptual Art and Earth Art — bound together by historical fact and physical accuracy.”

A methodical thinker, Tolle had spent plenty of time in Ireland doing research for this project which occupies half of acre overlooking the Statue of Liberty, and Ellis Island. The centerpiece is an 1820s stone cottage brought from Ireland. Also, stones from Ireland’s 32 counties and Irish flora were incorporating into the project, a reminder of the Great Irish Famine of 1845-52.

Tolle had installed two miles of historical references on the base of the Memorial, in the form of a lightning shadow. The text, lit from behind with the shadow cast on glass, is changed and updated periodically, so visitors approaching the Memorial on one day might happen to read a Quaker soup recipe that was used to help starving people in Ireland in 1847, and on another day statistics about the amount of dog food consumed in the United States. The artist believes that this textural engagement with the Memorial ultimately shapes visitors’ visceral experience as they move through the monument itself.

With sculptor Brian Tolle in his studio in Roxbury, New York. © Simona David

Tolle, who teaches a course on public art at Parsons, is alert to the fact that art shown in a museum or a gallery space is dedicated to a captive audience, an audience of interested gallery or museum goers. When it comes to public art, the artist explains: “There is no way of controlling, nor would you want to control the audience in a public space, so you never know who is going to come across a project, and how they might respond to it.” With that in mind, the artist envisioned a memorial that trusts the intelligence of the audience in interpreting the event of the famine and its historic significance.

By its very nature, public art is free and accessible to anyone. When it blends well with its surroundings, it gives meaning and shapes the identity of the space. Public art is also a reminder of the shared community values and aspirational goals.

Tolle will lead a special tour of the Irish Hunger Memorial this Saturday, October 28 from 2 to 3 pm, and discuss the history of the Memorial, as well as its recent renovation. A staff horticulturalist will be on hand to discuss the Memorial’s native Irish plantings as well.

To learn more about this event, visit Facebook.

© artinthecatskills.com

Pressing Cider at Hubbell Family Farm

Pressing cider has been a cherished tradition at Hubbell Family Farm since 1870 when the family acquired a custom-made press manufactured in Syracuse. For the first 40 years, the press was powered by a steam engine, replaced in 1917 with a gasoline engine that still runs today, a hundred years later.

© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David

A popular fall activity and tourist attraction in the Catskills, the Hubbell press turns 1 bushel of apples into 3 gallons a cider in what seems to be a venerated ceremony for enthusiast spectators.

© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David
© Simona David

Custom pressing, by appointment only, takes place every Saturday throughout the month of October. To make an appointment, call Burr Hubbell at (845) 586-2707, ext. 3 during regular business hours Monday through Friday.

The mill is located at 46124 State Hwy 30, Margaretville, New York.

For more information, follow Hubbell Family Farm on Facebook.

 

Artists on Art Tour at Olana

Olana, home of 19th century landscape painter Frederic Edwin Church in Hudson, is hosting Artist on Art Tour, a series of guided tours through Olana under the tutelage of contemporary artists working in various disciplines. Artistic storytelling is a compelling part of Olana’s ongoing narrative. Participating artists offer a unique lens with which to “read” Olana, and experiment and invent with “poetic license” as they explore through their own artistic practice Church’s home and studio as well as this season’s exhibition.

Olana Estate. Contributed Photo.

This Friday, October 6 at 4:30 pm musician Carrie Bradley tours Olana, calling attention to the transitionary and the “in betweens,” with an element of live music inside Olana. Bradley combines text; music of which there is record that the Church family enjoyed by composers they hosted at Olana; and her own original songs to invoke specifically the evenings of music the Churches hosted at Olana and to refer in general to the sensual spirit of music and sound at the house. Bradley speculates that, “The house during those events became a place where the felt power of music resonated within a container for so much powerful visual art and artifact, and also was during those times, for a stolen moment, a public place when it was usually his private sanctuary. In a similar way, the songs seek to capture the interplay between the public and the private that I feel in the views from the upper reaches of the house—an intimate and personal seat from which to view the awe-inspiring reach of the river and the sky.”

Carrie Bradley is a fiction and creative nonfiction writer as well as a guitarist, violinist, and vocalist. She was a founding member of the alternative folk band Ed’s Redeeming Qualities, has played with the Breeders since 1989, has since had her own bands 100 Watt Smile and the Great Auk, and has performed and/or recorded with Tanya Donelly, Jonathan Richman, John Wesley Harding, Love & Rockets, the Red House Painters, the Buckets, and many others. She lives, gardens, cavorts, and mulls deep in the Catskill Mountains.

Carrie Bradley. Photo Credit: Dave Rubin.

This program expands on the ideas found on site in Teresita Fernandez’s installation “OVERLOOK: Teresita Fernández Confronts Frederic Church at Olana” throughout Olana State Historic Site (May 13 – November 1). The Olana Partnership’s Director of Education, Amy Hufnagel, describes the public program this way: “Artists and cultural workers can teach us about Olana in ways we might not have even imagined; they are, in so many ways, logical “guides” to understanding and unpacking Olana to the contemporary era. The Olana Partnership wants to expand the narrative of Olana, and to express a multiplicity of stories here. Teresita Fernandez’s installation and the exhibition – paired with local artist tours – allows for a whole new set of conversations to emerge.” This innovative tour program privileges the voices of contemporary women artists and cultural workers whose own creative pursuits often find voice in the sphere of the “overlooked.” In specific, Olana’s team works to elevating the voices of these contemporary women artists with the end goal to expand and enlarge the interpretation at Olana.

Olana is the greatest masterpiece of Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900), the preeminent American artist of the mid-19th century. Church had a sustained interest in the Americas, resulting from his trips to Ecuador, Columbia, Mexico, and the Caribbean. In his own artwork depicting these landscapes and in the objects he collected throughout his life, Church’s passion for Latin America remains evident today. Church designed Olana as a holistic environment integrating his advanced ideas about art, architecture, landscape design, and environmental conservation. Olana’s 250-acre artist-designed landscape with a Persian-inspired house at its summit embraces unrivaled 360-degree views of the Hudson River Valley and beyond. Today Olana State Historic Site welcomes more than 170,000 visitors annually.

To learn more about Artist on Art Tour event, visit http://www.olana.org/calendar/.

The Arts Converge: Photographer Rudd Hubbell in Conversation with Nature Writer Leslie T. Sharpe

“How Art Is Made” at the Catskill Interpretive Center
Naturalist and nature writer Leslie T. Sharpe speaks about her passion for the wildlife of the Catskill Mountains
Nature photograph by Rudd Hubbell
Nature photograph by Rudd Hubbell
Photographer Rudd Hubbell in conversation with writer Leslie T. Sharpe
With Leslie T. Sharpe and Rudd Hubbell
The Quarry Fox has received great review from The New York Times
Honored to be acknowledged in the Quarry Fox, released earlier this year by The Overlook Press

 

Catskill Interpretive Center, Mt. Tremper, New York

September 23, 2017