Tag: the catskills

Art in the Catskills 2018 Events

How Art Is Made

4/29 Writers Unbound Literary Festival, Union Grove Distillery, Arkville, NY

6/23 Catskill Interpretive Center Book Festival, Mt. Tremper, NY

7/28 – 29 AMR Open Art Studio Tour, Halcottsville, NY

8/19 Blink Art Gallery, Andes, NY

9/8 Zadock Pratt Museum, Prattsville, NY


Look for our news releases to learn more about upcoming events.

 

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Writers Unbound – Fifth Annual Catskills Literary Festival

April 29, 2018

Union Grove Distillery

Arkville, New York

Featured Destination: John Burroughs Estates

Slabsides, West Park 

Naturalist John Burroughs built his log cabin in West Park, Ulster County in 1895, in the Adirondack style. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968, the cabin retains most of its original furnishings, and is open to the public year round. Slabsides is one mile east of Riverby, Burroughs’ main residence. The naturalist wrote some of his most celebrated essays while at Slabsides. He also wrote extensively at Riverby, as well as the Woodchuck Lodge in Roxbury, Delaware County, in the Western Catskill Mountains.

Since 1993 John Burroughs Association has honored authors, illustrators and publishers of nature writing by awarding three annual awards: John Burroughs Medal, John Burroughs Nature Essay Award, and Riverby Awards. The Awards Ceremony takes place every year in April at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Burroughs Drive, West Park, NY 12493

(845) 384-6320

For more information, visit

http://www.johnburroughsassociation.org

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Woodchuck Lodge. © Simona David

Woodchuck Lodge, Roxbury 

Woodchuck Lodge, also known as John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site, was built in the 1860s in the rustic farmhouse style, in Roxbury, Delaware County. It was Burroughs’ summer residence from 1910 to 1921. Burroughs is best known for his collections of nature essay such Wake Robin (1871), and Signs and Seasons (1886). The naturalist writer was friends with many luminaries including President Theodore Roosevelt, industrialist Henry Ford, inventor Thomas Edison, and poet Walt Whitman. Burroughs went to school with financier Jay Gould.

Born in Roxbury on April 3, 1837, he died in 1921, five days before his 84th birthday. He is buried at Boyhood Rock, where he used to play as a child, right next to the Woodchuck Lodge.

Guided tours are offered the first weekend of the month from May to October. Special events and talks are organized the first Saturday of the month, as part of the Wild Saturday series.

1633 Burroughs Memorial Road, Roxbury, NY 12474

For more information and current hours of operation, visit

http://woodchucklodge.org

John Burroughs’ Signs & Seasons. © Simona David

Bird Note dedicated an entire program to Burroughs this Sunday, January 21, 2018. Listen to the transcript at:

https://www.birdnote.org/show/john-burroughs

Book Reading Event at Roxbury General

Novelist Annie DeWitt and photographer Jerome Jakubiec spoke about their widely praised books “White Nights in Split Town City” and “I Actually Wore This: Clothes We Can’t Believe We Bought” at Roxbury General on Small Business Saturday, Nov. 25 this year.

© 2017 Simona David

The Los Angeles Review of Books depicts “White Nights in Split Town City” as “the story of what it means to feel desired and plugged into what surrounds us, and how this informs our identities from a very young age.” The book was released by Tyrant Books in August 2016.

The New Yorker describes “I Actually Wore This” as “Funny and surprisingly touching, revealing much about our moments of bold, optimistic self-assertion and their aftermath.” The book was released by Rizzoli in March 2017.

Both books are available at Roxbury General along with a vast array of merchandise from clothing and ceramics to sweets and holiday decorations.

© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David
© 2017 Simona David

DeWitt and Jakubiec live and work in Roxbury.

 

The Irish Hunger Memorial Re-Opens to the Public

The Irish Hunger Memorial. Contributed Photo.

The Irish Hunger Memorial, a public art project designed by sculptor Brian Tolle in Battery Park City, re-opened to the public late last summer after undergoing major renovations to address damage caused by water infiltration in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Originally built in the early 2000s, the monument opened for the first time on July 16, 2002. Roberta Smith from The New York Times described the monument as a “typically postmodern blend of existing art styles — Realism, Conceptual Art and Earth Art — bound together by historical fact and physical accuracy.”

A methodical thinker, Tolle had spent plenty of time in Ireland doing research for this project which occupies half of acre overlooking the Statue of Liberty, and Ellis Island. The centerpiece is an 1820s stone cottage brought from Ireland. Also, stones from Ireland’s 32 counties and Irish flora were incorporating into the project, a reminder of the Great Irish Famine of 1845-52.

Tolle had installed two miles of historical references on the base of the Memorial, in the form of a lightning shadow. The text, lit from behind with the shadow cast on glass, is changed and updated periodically, so visitors approaching the Memorial on one day might happen to read a Quaker soup recipe that was used to help starving people in Ireland in 1847, and on another day statistics about the amount of dog food consumed in the United States. The artist believes that this textural engagement with the Memorial ultimately shapes visitors’ visceral experience as they move through the monument itself.

With sculptor Brian Tolle in his studio in Roxbury, New York. © Simona David

Tolle, who teaches a course on public art at Parsons, is alert to the fact that art shown in a museum or a gallery space is dedicated to a captive audience, an audience of interested gallery or museum goers. When it comes to public art, the artist explains: “There is no way of controlling, nor would you want to control the audience in a public space, so you never know who is going to come across a project, and how they might respond to it.” With that in mind, the artist envisioned a memorial that trusts the intelligence of the audience in interpreting the event of the famine and its historic significance.

By its very nature, public art is free and accessible to anyone. When it blends well with its surroundings, it gives meaning and shapes the identity of the space. Public art is also a reminder of the shared community values and aspirational goals.

Tolle will lead a special tour of the Irish Hunger Memorial this Saturday, October 28 from 2 to 3 pm, and discuss the history of the Memorial, as well as its recent renovation. A staff horticulturalist will be on hand to discuss the Memorial’s native Irish plantings as well.

To learn more about this event, visit Facebook.

© artinthecatskills.com