Tag: Roxbury

September in Roxbury

Learn more about Roxbury at visitroxbury.com.

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Impressions from the AMR Open Studios Tour 2017

Launched in 2012, AMR Open Studios Tour has grown into a major art destination, forging new and unexpected connections between artists, and their patrons from near and far. Given its success in previous years, in 2017 AMR – Artists Making aRt ™ – Open Studios Tours 2017 expanded to include some 40 artists from Margaretville, Roxbury, Stamford, Delhi, and surrounding areas. The tours took place on two different weekends in July: Saturday and Sunday, July 8 – 9 in Stamford-Delhi art community, and Saturday and Sunday, July 29-30 in Margaretville-Roxbury art community. Both weekends attracted a myriad of visitors, many artists as well as collectors from the Catskills, New York City, and abroad.

AMR 2017. Photo © 2017 Simona David

On the first weekend, watercolorist June Lanigan who, at 91, continues to paint and make collages, showed recent works and discussed what moves her these days. Although Lanigan works in other media as well (i.e., oil, and acrylic), she is most fond of watercolors; and everywhere she goes she brings along a sketchbook to take in the environment. The portrait of a flapper draws my attention in Lanigan’s immense home that she shares with her family while painting in the Catskills. Lanigan is the founder of MURAL Gallery in Hobart, and has had a long connection with the area.

June Lanigan. Photo © 2017 Simona David

Both Lanigan’s daughters Tracy Jacknow and Toni Layden-Rodgers as well as her grandson Jess Zimmerman are painters; each has a distinctive style, and is attracted to different subject matters. Jacknow, for instance, paints abstract and impressionistic like landscapes, while Layden-Rodgers is interested in domestic scenes, still lifes, and portraits, whereas Zimmerman paints bold, urban scenes.

Jess Zimmerman. Photo © 2017 Simona David

Jacknow is married to stained glass artist Barry Jacknow, whose work is inspired by the Art Deco movement, and the work of architect and designer Frank Lloyd Wright. Stained glass has had a long tradition in New York going back to Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Art Nouveau lamps and decorative objects that became synonym with sophistication. Jacknow sources his stained glass locally in Stamford, and works meticulously to create patterns and contrast colors for most effect.

Barry Jacknow. Photo © 2017 Simona David

My next stop was at Robert Schneider and Susan Goetz’s mansion in Stamford. Husband and wife, Schneider and Goetz had studied at the Art Students League of New York, and also privately with accomplished painters. While Schneider specializes in landscape, Goetz dedicates most of her time to still life and portrait. Her studio is filled with family portraits and domestic scenes signifying opulence and good taste. Goetz was commissioned by West Point’s class of 1931 to paint a series of portraits which included Presidents Eisenhower, Reagan, and Bush, and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. Goetz comes from a family of artists – her father Richard Goetz, who passed away in 1991, was an accomplished painter as well. A portrait of her mother by famous painter Nelson Shanks illuminates the hallway.

Susan Goetz. Photo © 2017 Simona David

Both Goetz and her husband Schneider were featured in American Artist in November 2007.

Schneider, who is very much fascinated by the Hudson River School of Painting, captures through his plein airs spectacular views of the Catskill Mountains and the Hudson Valley as well as the Leatherstocking region where the family has spent a lot of time. Schneider was featured at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown in 2016 in a one man show called “A New York View.”

Robert Schneider. Photo © 2017 Simona David

My last stop that weekend was at Solveig Comer’s ceramics studio in South Kortright. Located in the basement of a former church, the studio has three electric kilns, and lots of fine porcelain for many bowls and cups to come. The artist patiently explains the difference between using an electric kiln versus a gas one, and the differences in output each creates. It is a laborious process, but Comer doesn’t seem to mind.

Solveig Comer. Photo © 2017 Simona David

***

The second weekend was a marathon of exhibits, demonstrations, conversations, and parties centered around Roxbury which had a stellar participation this year with the likes of Adam Cohen and Brian Tolle opening their studios as part of the AMR Tour for the first time.

Roxbury Abbey. Photo © 2017 Simona David

Brian Tolle showed several of his works at Roxbury Abbey including three Levittown style houses made of platinum silicone rubber. Also, visible in his studio was a head sculpture of Benjamin Franklin, as seen by Brian Tolle. In 2016 Tolle exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia as part of “Commander in Chief” art show dedicated to American presidents.

Brian Tolle. Photo © 2017 Simona David

In addition to works by Tolle, Roxbury Abbey also hosted that weekend a group show curated by Ace Ehrlich who brought several artists from the city just for the event, including German artist Thorsten Brinkmann.

Brian Tolle’s Studio. Photo © 2017 Simona David

The youngest participant in the tour was Sophia Maduri, who showed her work at the Grange in Halcottsville, and sold her first drawing right there – the beginning of a career. My book “How Art Is Made: In the Catskills” was also for sale at the Grange, and provided more context for some of the artworks shown during the tour, a symbiotic relationship.

Sophia Maduri. Photo © 2017 Simona David

Also in Roxbury painters Esther De Jong and Michael Guilmet opened their studio for the first time. De Jong showed some of her oil paintings and pencil drawings, while Guilmet displayed two dozen oil paintings in various styles, and depicting various subject matters – winter landscapes, abstract compositions, and lots of portraits, many of those on commission. Recently De Jong and Guilmet curated an exhibition at Orphic Gallery in Roxbury that included some of the best artworks produced in the region from painters like Adam Cohen, Ann Lee Fuller, and Christopher Durham.

Esther De Jong. Photo © 2017 Simona David
Michael Guilmet
Michael Guilmet. Contributed Photo.

Lisbeth Firmin was one of several artists participating in Margaretville area – her studio is located in the Commons Building. This year Firmin showed some of her urban landscape paintings as well as monotypes produced while studying at Scuola Internationale di Grafica in Venice this past spring. Later this month Firmin will lead a one-week drawing workshop at MURAL Gallery in Hobart, designed as an intensive combination of lectures, demonstrations, and studio exercises.

Lisbeth Firmin’s Studio. Photo © 2017 Simona David

AMR Open Studio Tour 2018 will include even more artists and activities to showcase the abundance of artistic endeavors our region is known for.

© 2017 Simona David

 

 

Featured Artist: Leslie T. Sharpe

Leslie T. Sharpe. © Simona David
Leslie T. Sharpe. © Simona David

Leslie T. Sharpe is an author, editor, and educator. She began her editing career at Farrar, Straus & Giroux and is currently an editorial consultant specializing in literary nonfiction, literary fiction, and poetry. A member of PEN American Center, she is the author of Editing Fact and Fiction: A Concise Guide to Book Editing (Cambridge University Press, 1994), which is regarded as a “modern editing classic” and “On Writing Smart: Tips and Tidbits,” featured in The Business of Writing (Allworth, 2012).  Leslie has been a regular contributor to Newsday’s “Urban ‘I’” column, and her essays and articles have appeared in a variety of publications including the Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, Global City Review, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, New York Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, San Francisco Chronicle, and Village Voice; The Villager; The Writer; and Psychology Today. She recently finished her memoir, Our Fractured, Perfect Selves, and her new book, The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills, a lyric narrative look at the wild animals of the Catskill Mountains, will be published by The Overlook Press in the spring of 2017. Her poems for children have appeared in Ladybug Magazine. Leslie has taught writing and editing at Columbia University, New York University and the City College of New York.

Simona David: Leslie, you are well-known to the Catskills literary community as an instructor for Writers in the Mountains. You also taught for MediaBistro. And of course, for a long time, you taught at Columbia University in New York City. Your new book The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills will be published in the spring of 2017 by The Overlook Press. Congratulations!

Leslie T. Sharpe: Thank you. I am delighted to say that my book The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills is set to be published by The Overlook in spring 2017. The Overlook Press started in Woodstock, but their offices are now located in Manhattan. Since the 1970s the press has had a wonderful specialty area for Catskills books, Hudson River Valley books; that’s why my agent and I really wanted to be published by them. They have a large list, including literary fiction, literary nonfiction, history, and other parts of that genre. For instance, Alf Evers’ The Catskills, From Wilderness to Woodstock was published by The Overlook in 1972.

SD: You’ve been a naturalist all your life, very much involved with Audubon Society. What is a naturalist, and what does he / she do?

LTS: The thing that I’m proudest of with regard to my environmental credentials is that I was president of Junior Audubon when I was in the 2nd grade. I’ve also been the vice president of New York City Audubon Society, and editor of the Urban Audubon. And like most people who love nature, I’m a lifelong birder and naturalist. Of course, there are many definitions of naturalists. In a large sense, a naturalist is just someone who observes nature. This could be a backyard birder or a wild life biologist. Everyone who looks out their window, and watches their bird feeder, welcomes the hummingbirds, puts out sunflower seeds for the chipmunks, and watches their antics and often records them – this is what a naturalist is, and the basis of our knowledge about nature really comes from people like you and I who are not trained as scientists but watch and observe and record. And there are many events that honor this. For instance, National Audubon and other organizations have what they call “bird counts” such as the Christmas bird count in December: people are urged to go out and count the number of birds they see, which species, the number of birds in each species; and this kind of anecdotal information is an incredibly important part of our knowledge of birds and animals, and our sense of population rise and fall, and the effects of the environment on them, the effects of winter on them, and the effects of summer on them. So, yes, basically a naturalist is someone who just observes, and keeps a diary, and writes down his or her observations.

SD: One doesn’t have to have scientific training in order to be a naturalist. Is that right?

LTS: A naturalist has a very personal and deeply felt connection to the natural world. To be a naturalist in essence all you need is a pen and a notebook, perhaps a recorder. But the most important tools are your senses. It’s not really a division however between a naturalist and a scientist. For instance, Rachel Carson who was a scientist was also a naturalist. These are not mutually exclusive occupations. My point is that anyone can watch, anyone can observe, anyone can record. And those are very valuable insights.

SD: You teach a Nature Writing workshop for Writers in the Mountains in the tradition of naturalist writer John Burroughs, a Catskills native. Participants range from memoirists and essayists to journalists and scientists. Let’s talk about various approaches to nature writing.  

LTS: There are so many aspects to nature. We think automatically of critters, and that’s largely what I’m writing about. But in my upcoming book I also have a whole chapter on wild flowers. Without dandelions in early spring what would the bees do? It’s the first thing bees find once they come out of their hibernation. Everything in nature has a purpose. And there are so many aspects to nature writing, not only the genre it can take, but also what you’re writing about. For instance, in my class we had people writing essays, journals, poetry, and some fiction as well. We had someone working on sketches for a book. A photographer, working on a multi-media project, brought his photographs to class, and shared some other angles.

SD: Let’s talk about the writing process. How does your routine look like? How do you alternate between observing nature and then writing about it?

LTS: It’s really organic. For instance, all the chapters in my book The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills are about different creatures. And they’re all marked by two things: it’s my direct experience with the critter, but it’s also the latest science on the subject. Because there is so much that is being discovered. And although my book is described as a lyric narrative book about the wild animals of the Catskill Mountains, it’s also informed by the latest science. One of the hardest things to do when involved with these creatures is to remain objective and not to become sentimental. Another struggle is to not interfere and not to project our own emotions on them. They have their own emotions.

SD: Have you done a lot of research for the book?

LTS: Yes. There are many sources, but you have to weigh them carefully. For instance, All About Birds, which is from Cornell Institute of Ornithology, that’s a fabulous resource. Audubon also has its own online resources. As a trained classicist, I very much enjoy doing research as part of the learning process. But I’m also scrupulous with my sources, both in print and online.

SD: Would you like to expand a bit, and talk about the genre of creative nonfiction?

LTS: The Quarry Fox, as narrative nonfiction, is themed to the wild Catskills, but every chapter is essentially a different personal essay. That is very much in the tradition of John Burroughs, the founder of the nature writing genre in America. One of the things that I do in my book, is that I dedicate each chapter to a nature writer that I love. The first chapter is dedicated to John Burroughs, a spiritual father of mine. I have a chapter dedicated to Edward Abbey, another one to Annie Dillard. I believe Abbey’s Desert Solitaire is the best nature writing book ever written. Dillard, on the other hand, is a mentor to anyone writing creative nonfiction.

John Burroughs Memorial Home in Roxbury, NY. © Simona David
John Burroughs Memorial Home in Roxbury, NY. © Simona David

SD: You have taught for Writers in the Mountains a workshop called Selling Your Nonfiction Book: The Art of Proposal Writing. Would you like to share a few tips?

LTS: Nonfiction is such a popular form, a lot of folks are working on memoir and personal essays. To sell a nonfiction book, whether you hire an agent or not, you need a book proposal to show it to the publisher. When it comes to nonfiction, publishers don’t want to see a whole book right away; what they want is a proposal. The proposal breaks down into certain aspects, including a marketing plan, a literature review, and some sample chapters. It’s important for the publisher to know who the book is for and how they can sell it, also if there are other similar books out there, and what credentials the author has. In my case, there are very few other books out there since John Burroughs that really cover the Catskills’ wild life. It’s important to know that everything you write when you submit to a publisher or an agent is a writing sample. The query letter is a writing sample, and is a sample of professionalism. The proposal itself, and the description of the chapters mirror the quality of the chapters themselves.

SD: What makes a naturalist also a good nature writer?

LTS: I am a writer, and I believe that we humans are hard-wired for stories. That’s what compels us. We tell our stories, and pass them down. Most people who write about nature are most certainly naturalists, they observe nature. Most naturalists are not necessarily nature writers. But what drives us as naturalists who are also nature writers is our desire to tell stories. How you tell your story is completely up to you. Nature writing is a great American form, not uniquely American, but this country is so extraordinarily beautiful, and there is such a diversity of landscape and critters and birds of all kinds that we’ve been shaped by it.

Leslie tweets at https://twitter.com/catskillcritter.

© 2016 Simona David

Not to Miss This Weekend: AMR Open Studios Tour 2016

This weekend, Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31, from 11 am to 5 pm over twenty artists in Roxbury, Halcottsville, Margaretville, Fleischmanns, Halcott Center, Arkville, and Andes will open their studios to the public, and show their working spaces.

A good place to start the tour is the Wawaka (Halcottsville) Grange, which is true to its original function as a Grange and General Store. Refreshments, bathrooms, and handicap access are available at this location. Several artists will be showing at the Grange, including painters Sophia Maduri and Oneida Hammond.

Oneida Hammond with her watercolors and sketchbooks
Painter Oneida Hammond will be showing her watercolors again at the Grange in Halcottsville. © Simona David

Alix Travis, one of the founding members of the tour, will once again open her studio located at 103 Bragg Hollow Road in Halcottsville. An established plein air painter, Alix has received several awards and recognitions, including signature status in the Pennsylvania Watercolor Society and the NY Plein Air Painters. In 2014 she published The Catskill Coloring Book, which includes twenty-six of her plein air watercolor paintings. This weekend, during the open studios tour, Alix will paint en plein air, and will demonstrate some of her techniques.

Urban realist painter Lisbeth Firmin will be showing her oil paintings and monotype prints at her studio located in the Commons Building in Margaretville. Lisbeth is known for works such as Fifth Avenue (1995), and Woman on a Train (2014). Just recently she opened a new show at Rice – Polak Gallery in Provincetown, MA where she has been exhibiting for many years. Lisbeth asserts that her work is really not about the colors, but about the light and shadow in the composition.

22" x 30" monoprint, 2015, printed by the artist at Hudson Press, Roxbury, NY
Lisbeth Firmin’s Beckett Reading monoprint (2015). Contributed Photo.

Multi-media artist Alan Powell and painter Lesley Powell will be showing their work at 993 Main Street in Fleischmanns, and painter Anthony Margiotta will open his studio located at 355 Route 3 in Halcott Center. Margiotta, who does not have formal training as an artist, draws inspiration from his surroundings, whether be the woods of the Catskill Mountains or the urban scenes of New York City.

In Arkville, painter and printmaker Amy Masters, and architect and printmaker Ted Sheridan will be opening their studios located at 222 Chris Long Road. Over the past year or so Amy has been working on a series of monotype prints inspired by feathers. The fragility and the uniqueness of this object has captivated her, and she has decided to set and explore various shapes and tones that come with the printmaking process. Her husband Ted Sheridan will be showing a series of metallic prints capturing the oxidation process, and in so doing, retaining the most spectacular shapes and forms on paper.

Feather inspired prints by Amy Masters
Feather inspired prints by Amy Masters. © Simona David

Poet and furniture designer Gary Mead will be showing his gallery at 1289 South Side Road in Margaretville, and sculptor Ken Hiratsuka will be opening his barn at 34325 State Hwy 28 in Andes.

Heading back over to Roxbury, you’ll have the opportunity to stop by weaver Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes, whose studio is located at 424 Carr George Road in Denver. Tabitha has in her studio a professional loom, and happily demonstrates how to work the weft and create the density that is desired for a new piece. Weaving is one of the oldest forms of a blend of art and function,” she explains. “And it’s gratifying that it isn’t forgotten.”

In Roxbury painters Ellen Wong and Helene Manzo, photographer Frank Manzo, ceramicists and printmakers Peter Yamaoka and Gerda Van Leeuwen, and sculptor John Sanders will all show new works produced over the past year. Studio visits trigger questions that aren’t often asked in formal settings such as galleries and museums, and provide access to an intimate space that the artist doesn’t often share with others.

Artist Gerda Van Leeuwen in her studio in Roxbury
Artist Gerda Van Leeuwen in her studio in Roxbury. © Simona David

To learn more about the tour, read our feature story at https://artinthecatskills.com/2016/07/19/featured-destination-amr-open-studios-tour-2016/.

For maps and more information, visit http://www.amropenstudios.org. As you drive around this weekend, look for the “OPEN STUDIO” signs and brochures with maps available for pick up at various business sponsors and community supporters.

The AMR Open Studio Tour 2016 is funded by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Grant Program, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and is administered in Delaware County by The Roxbury Arts Group, and with fiscal support from The MARK Project and participating artists.

SPONSORED STORY

© 2016 Simona David

 

Featured Destination: AMR Open Studios Tour 2016

Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31, over twenty artists in Andes, Margaretville and Roxbury area (AMR, for short) will open their studios to the public, and show their working spaces. During the tour, artists working in all media will talk about their styles and techniques, and the process of making art. Launched in 2012, AMR has been a great success, attracting a large number of visitors summer after summer. Similar tours take place all over the country, as open studios have become quite popular in recent years.

This year AMR features artists such as: painter and printmaker Amy Masters; architect, printmaker and photographer Ted Sheridan; urban landscape painter Lisbeth Firmin; ceramicists and printmakers Peter Yamaoka and Gerda Van Leeuwen; landscape painter Ellen Wong; weaver Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes; and poet and furniture designer Gary Mead, among others.

Amy Masters

Amy Masters has been an artist all her life. Formally trained as painter and printmaker, she pursued a degree in Interior Design at the Parsons School of Design, and worked as a draftsman for an engineering firm in New York City, before dedicating herself exclusively to painting and drawing. For over two decades, she taught in the New York City’s public school system, and spent her summers painting and drawing the world around. Moving to the Catskills in 2006, she was suddenly given far more space and limitless opportunities for inspiration. Amy likes to think about her work as being inspired by the natural world and the actual objects and vistas around her studio. But she likes to re-arrange and re-envision the landscape in the abstract. What is important to an abstract painter, says Amy, is the relationship between colors, lines and shapes, and the complexities of pattern and texture that emerge at the end of the process.

Her color palette changes periodically. Last summer, for instance, she was working extensively in blue, green, and red. This summer she enjoys exploring the possibilities of various shades of white, beige, and grey. But she always likes to add an unexpected dot of red somewhere on the canvas to surprise and intrigue the viewer.

A couple of years ago Amy re-discovered her passion for prints, and after taking an etching class in the City and working in a printmaking studio, she began producing prints using a variety of techniques. She currently works on a series of prints inspired by feathers. “When I was doing these prints, I was thinking how unique and individual these feathers were, and that resonated with the process too. Because each time you make one of these monotypes, they’re completely different.”

Painter and printmaker Amy Masters working on a series of monotypes inspired by feathers
Painter and printmaker Amy Masters working on a series of monotypes inspired by feathers. © Simona David

Amy will be showing her prints during the open studios tour later this month, and will be talking about various printmaking techniques. Her studio is located at 222 Chris Long Road in Arkville.

Ted Sheridan

Ted Sheridan is an architect, printmaker, and photographer. He has taught courses on architectural acoustics and the acoustics of musical instruments at the Parsons School of Design, and has lectured at the University of Virginia, Ryerson University, and the University of Toronto.

Six years ago, Ted began experimenting with metallic compounds, corrosion, and magnetic fields to create original patterns of rust on paper. For his very first project he used old, rusty car parts, and after leaving them out in the rain on a piece of paper, he discovered an immense array of shapes and shades that he did not expect. Coming from the world of architecture where everything is controlled and precise, Ted sat to explore the randomness of the oxidation process, and began working on more and more elaborate projects.

Metallic Print by Ted Sheridan
Metallic Print by Ted Sheridan. © Simona David

About a dozen prints are hanging in his studio at this time. Each one of them was produced by a different method and stylistic approach; some are concentric circles reminiscent of nebulas in space, others are rectangular stripes imposing in their own right. All these will be shown during the open studios tour on Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31.

Ted’s studio is located at 222 Chris Long Road in Arkville.

Lisbeth Firmin

Lisbeth Firmin is a contemporary American realist known for her urban landscapes. For over four decades her work has been in hundreds of solo and group shows across the country and internationally. She was cover artist for the 2008 spring issue of Epoch, Cornell University’s literary magazine, and was the featured artist in the 2008 summer issue of the Gettysburg Review. Awards include a 2007 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for printmaking (Lily Auchincloss Fellow) and a Merit Award at the 2007 Roberson Regional Art Exhibition, Binghamton, NY, juried by Philip Pearlstein. Lisbeth was awarded a Community Arts Funding Grant, New York State Council on the Arts in 2007. Other awards include a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, the New York Print Club Emerging Artist Award, the CCVA Award at the Chautauqua Center for the Visual Arts, first prize in the LANA International Arts Competition; along with full fellowships to the MacDowell Colony, National Seashore Residency, the Vermont Studio Center and Saltonstall Arts Colony.

Asked about her artistic process, Lisbeth responded: “I can’t explain that. It’s a visceral thing. I could be walking around, and doing grocery shopping or some other mundane stuff like that. And I see something, and I say I want to paint that. I don’t even verbalize it. It’s more like I could paint that, I want to paint that. Now I always have my little iPhone with me. And what’s happening these days is that I see something about the light on a figure, and this is what interests me. And it just comes naturally to me: I know exactly where to put the paint, and how to capture the light. I’m moving away from buildings and streetscapes.” Lisbeth says that her work is not about the colors, but about the light and shadow in the composition, apparent in works such as Fifth Avenue (1995), and Woman on a Train (2014).

Fifth Avenue, 7" x 15", gouache, 1995. Contributed photo.
Fifth Avenue, 7″ x 15″, gouache, 1995. Contributed photo.

To learn more about the artist, read our extensive interview with Lisbeth: https://artinthecatskills.com/2015/08/31/featured-artist-lisbeth-firmin. Her studio is located in the Commons Building at 785 Main Street, Margaretville.

Peter Yamaoka and Gerda Van Leeuwen

Artists Peter Yamaoka and Gerda Van Leeuwen met in a Boston airport in the early 1980s as they were both traveling to and from Provincetown. They married three years later. Peter studied at the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, while Gerda received a degree in art from the University of Utrecht in her native Netherlands. In college both Peter and Gerda studied painting. Later in their artistic careers, they specialized in printmaking: Peter chose lithographs, while Gerda directed her attention to etchings. Since moving to the Catskills in the early 1990s both artists switched to ceramics: Peter prefers voluminous mythology-inspired vases, while Gerda makes small porcelains inspired by animal life. In Tribeca Peter and Gerda operated a printmaking shop. In the Catskills, they opened a fully equipped ceramics studio, where they both work and teach classes. Both artists have exhibited extensively in New York City and throughout the Catskills.

Ceramicist Peter Yamaoka in his studio
Ceramicist Peter Yamaoka in his studio. © Simona David

Peter’s vases are inspired by ancient Chinese motifs, Greek mythology, Mexican folklore, and the Catskills scenery. All his vases are both functional and decorative at the same time: “they’re sculptures,” Peter tells me. They withhold on top whimsical cities or mythological figures, an invitation to imagining and exploring. He also makes dioramas, fully employing the narrative feature of this form of art. All his vases and bowls are hand-made out of clay, then fired on an electrical kiln, and glazed in expressive, telling ways.

Gerda makes small porcelains inspired by animal life – primarily dogs and coyotes that we ordinarily see in the Catskills. Her anthropomorphic approach often leads to scenes of dancing dogs in a very human-like posture – portrayals that remind me of Matisse’s Dance. Victorian era practice of combining human heads and animal bodies or vice versa to awing effect in art also pops into my head. Gerda makes monotype prints on rice paper and canvas, similarly inspired by highly anthropomorphic pursuits. A large printing press occupies the central space of one of the studios.

On occasion Gerda makes woodblock prints. She currently works on a large scale wall piece using water based ink on paper and wood panel. A metal template is used to create a specific pattern that recurs throughout the composition. This particular work is done primarily in blue and gold hues. It will soon hang in a New York City apartment.

Peter and Gerda's Ceramics Garden
Peter and Gerda’s Ceramics Garden. © Simona David

Both Peter and Gerda are proud of their garden: the artists craft copious outdoor pieces that blend organically with the landscape. The tree of life reappears sporadically throughout the garden. Peter and Gerda have participated in the AMR Open Studios Tour ever since the tour first launched in 2012. Every summer they open both their studios and the garden, and demonstrate ceramics and printmaking techniques. Peter and Gerda’s studios are located at 777 Carroll Hinkley Road in Roxbury.

Ellen Wong

The recipient of many grants and fellowships, including the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Grant Program, as well as a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Ellen Wong is an accomplished painter and educator whose works have been exhibited both in New York City and the Catskills, going back to the 1970s. Ellen studied in the Art Department at Brooklyn College with Philip Pearlstein, known for reviving realist figurative painting in the 1960s. Pearlstein’s departure from Abstract Expressionism back then made him a renegade in the art world. It’s that kind of artistic sensibility and daring attitude that Ellen learned from Pearlstein.

Landscape painting by Ellen Wong. Contributed photos.
Watercolor by Ellen Wong. Contributed photo.

Ellen herself was initially trained as an abstract painter, but in time she discovered that what she really wanted to do in life was landscape painting: “I noticed that every time I went somewhere I always brought with me my watercolors, and I always sketched where I was; somehow that’s how I got to understand, absorb or take in a new environment – I felt very sensitive to place,” she says. “And it was a good way for me to get to know a place. And I discovered that I had this desire to work outside, to work from life, and to work in watercolors, and that became in a way my primary medium,” she added.

Ellen’s studio is located at 121 Shephard Lane in Roxbury.

To learn more about Ellen, read our extensive interview with her at https://artinthecatskills.com/2014/10/18/featured-artist-ellen-wong/.

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes

Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes is a professional weaver residing in Delaware County. She studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), and the Center for Tapestry Arts in New York City. She designs both functional and aesthetic products using traditional American patterns. Her work can be seen in museums and gallery exhibits, and at various arts and crafts fairs throughout the region.

“Weaving is one of the oldest forms of a blend of art and function. The techniques of twisting fibers to make them stronger and durable started out probably in the earliest times of mankind history. From those twisted fibers men and women learned to do basketry, learned to create fabric, and also to use it for decoration. For instance, in a lot of the Native American pottery from the South-Western U.S. and Central and South America you will see that twisted fibers have been pressed up against the clay to create a pattern on that clay. It’s been made as an impression on the clay to make it look as it was woven. In reality, it is a three-dimensional structure that was never plated or twisted in itself,” explains Tabitha.

Weaver Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes
Weaver Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes. © Simona David

Tabitha says she loves the fact that weaving isn’t a forgotten art. She particularly enjoys the mathematical structure of setting up the loom, and is excited about what it takes to create fabric. Her favorite part is mixing the colors, and the texture of the yarns together. “To me that’s magical – how I get a piece of fabric: something out of nothing.”

Tabitha’s studio is located at 424 Carr George Road in Denver. To learn more about Tabitha, read our extensive interview with her at https://artinthecatskills.com/2015/01/31/featured-artist-tabitha-gilmore-barnes/.

Gary Mead

Poet and furniture designer Gary Mead grew up on a farm in New Kingston, and fell in love with wood as a teenager, when he began working in a sawmill. In 1979 he opened his own company Fruitful Furnishings, and for many years designed and built custom furniture for clients all over the country. “The woodworking passion would not leave me alone, so as I was running the mill and raising my three sons, I was working on my home in Arkville composing pantries, kitchen cabinets, furniture, floors, walls and ceilings from wood, practically turning my home into a museum of woods,” he says.

Gary’s artistic eye and his understanding of the wood led him in recent years to creating compositions from curved and more unusual wood. In 2011 he opened his art gallery, dedicated exclusively to wood. While some pieces are both functional and aesthetic, others are purely decorative. The floor in his gallery is representative of all the trees growing in the Catskill Mountains from walnut, beechnut, butternut, maple, cherry, and birch trees to various kinds of pine. All these have been used to designing durable tables, cabinets, and pantries. Gary proudly proclaims that all the compositions in his gallery are actually from woods within a fifty-mile radius from his galley. “I am excited to teach people about the wealth of wood we have right here in our back yard,” he says. He will be showing his gallery during the open studios tour on Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31. His studio is located at 1289 South Side Road in Margaretville.

Xylophone Table by Gary Mead
Xylophone Table by Gary Mead. © Simona David

The AMR Open Studios Tour takes place Saturday and Sunday, July 30 – 31, from 11 am to 5 pm both days. For maps and more information, visit http://www.amropenstudios.org/.

The AMR Open Studio Tour 2016 is funded by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Grant Program, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and is administered in Delaware County by The Roxbury Arts Group, and with fiscal support from The MARK Project and participating artists.

SPONSORED STORY

© 2016 Simona David

Weekend in the Catskills – 7/01/2016

This weekend:

  • Jupiter String Quartet performs at Maverick Concert Hall;
  • A traditional Sidewalk Festival takes place in Roxbury;
  • And, Stagecoach Run Art Festival celebrates its 21st anniversary.

Read more at Upstater.com.

Happy Independence Day!